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Geneva

Who would you like to see in the World Drum Corps Hall of Fame?

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One person high on that list should be Stanley Knaub. Here's a bio on Stanley:

Stanley Knaub’s marching career started in Southern California with the Lakewood High School band where he went on to march with the Lynwood Diplomats Drum and Bugle Corps and later with the Anaheim Kingsmen as a french horn. Stanley later moved north to play mellophone with the Santa Clara Vanguard, marching with other DCI Hall of Fame legends - Jim Ott, Mike Moxley and Wayne Downey all under the legend Gail Royer. Those who marched with Stanley would remember him on the practice field, wrapped in a blanket instead of a coat as his clothing of choice to keep warm. While a talented horn player, Stanley’s forte came through his intricate design and flare working in the color guard world. He started instructing the Santa Clara Vanguard Color Guard during the1974-1976 seasons, with his color guard winning the DCI Championship. Stanley’s creativity and innovations work with color guard continued through the Winter Guard competitions. At that time California seem to be the hot bed for new ideas flag-rifle-sabre work, and innovators like Sherlee Whitcomb (WGI Hall of Famer) and Stanley Knaub (WGI Hall of Famer) turned the drum corps world around in adding visual color and effect, changing drum corps field shows from the old standard regimented flag work to new flowing and evolving design work that blew the drum corps world away. Stanley later went on to work with other drum corps, amazing everyone when his color guard (the Seattle Imperials) showed up at a competition wearing ballet slippers versus the standard marching boot – a first! His designs and creativity pushed Drum Corps visuals into the ‘90’s and the new millennium. Stanley’s visual art form of color guards blended amazingly well with what has become today’s total visual effects concept, incorporating moving flag work, spinning rifles, saber movement and one of the first to introduce dance to the drum corps world. He produced numerous instructional videos (“State of the Art Clinic"), which became the standard for all drum corps color guards. Stanley’s visual impact on color guard revolutionized the activity with the addition of dance to make color guard and drum corps more visually pleasing to the crowd. His visionary work with numerous drum corps and winter guards throughout the drum corps world will continue to impact marching for decades to come.

Stanley passed away in 2002 in Seattle, Washington. While greatly missed, his legacy lives on in the creative and colorful visual impact central to today’s Drum Corps.

Marched:

Lynwood Diplomats Drum & Bugle Corps, CA

Anaheim Kingsmen Drum & Bugle Corps, CA

Santa Clara Vanguard Drum & Bugle Corps, CA

Instructor

Santa Clara Vanguard Color Guard 1974-1976

Seattle Imperials Drum & Bugle Corps 1977

Seattle Shamrocks Drum & Bugle Corps

Fantasia Color Guard

WGI Hall of Fame 1992

Edited by amadorj

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Another person is Keith Markey (Air Force Academy Drum and Bugle Corps); pupil of Col. Truman W. Crawford.

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Wes Hobby.

Best drum corps public-address announcer ever, IMO.

Fran

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I want to know if an inanimate object can go in the HoF. If/when the Troopers retire the Sheep Wagon souvie booth, it needs a permanent place in drum corps history! (probably at the corps headquarters or something, but who knows where it might end up!)

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Wes Hobby.

Best drum corps public-address announcer ever, IMO.

Fran

Snappy dresser, too...

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bump

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Another person is Keith Markey (Air Force Academy Drum and Bugle Corps); pupil of Col. Truman W. Crawford.

:tongue::worthy::ph34r:

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Another person is Keith Markey (Air Force Academy Drum and Bugle Corps); pupil of Col. Truman W. Crawford.

How about a quick bio Jesse. Interested because I've met some of the USAF Bolling Field (Wash. DC)corps members. And for anyone who doesn't know (I didn't), the Bolling Field corps was disbanded in the 60s and the Academy corps created.

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I'd like to see Dennis Hagner in the DCI hall of fame.

Dennis joined the St. Matthias Cadets in 1958 and through hard work made the snare line rather quickly. Dennis was in the Cadets for 4 years, then marched snare in the Cavaliers for two years before aging out.

After aging out, Dennis arranged for and/or instructed for the St. Mathias Cadets, the St. Patrick's Imperial, the South Milwaukee Mariners, Racine Scouts, Salina (KA) Silver Sabres, and numerous smaller corps around the Midwest.

His judging career began with the Central States Judges Association in 1965. He later joined the Wisconsin All-American Judges Association, where he headed-up the percussion caption and helped develop many top notch adjudicators who would go on to judge many National and DCI contests. Names like Joe Colla, Jim Nordgren, Tom Sorenson, John Mathy, Tom Roe, Oscar Mayer, and several were mentored by Dennis. Dennis was also one of the founders of The Federation of Contest Judges which became the benchmark for drum and bugle corps judging associations in America. During Dennis’ 18 years as an adjudicator, he was recognized as one of the top drum judges and served throughout the United States. His most notable assignments included the World Open the first DCI National contest in 1972. Some of his off field accomplishments included the creation of the percussion “exposure to error” caption, in the 1970’s and assisting in the writing of the first DCI percussion judges manual.

Dennis consulted for the Santa Clara Vanguard and the Phantom Regiment. His work with Phantom included securing his old friend John Brazale to head the visual caption and Jim Neverman, a former student from Kansas, as drum instructor. Those two staff additions helped propel Phantom to championship caliber form.

Dennis was a full time employee of DCI in the early years, handling their finances, tickets and souvies. He was also responsible for creating and conductiing DCI Winter meeting Money Management seminars.

In the mid 70s, Dennis became the Business Manager for the Racine Kilties Jr. Corps. The following year he became the Corps Director. He also served as Mariners Corps Director for several years. Dennis was the Kiltie President/Board Chairman from 1995 – 1999 before his failing health forced him into retirement.

Dennis truly wore many hats and would do whatever it took at any time to benefit the activity that he so loved!

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bimp

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