stevedb1975

Trends in horn writing.

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Anyone notice how the checker board seems to change every several years in terms of brass writing trends. In the mid/late 90s pretty much through the mid 2000s, it was all about 16th note runs. Which arranger could out write the others with their running 16th note licks? And which hornlines could out perform all other hornline's runs? Lately, it seems like multi-tounging is the new trend (double and tripple tonguing). Corps still do runs of course but now the big contest is who can out articulate each other? Makes me wonder what the next new trend in brass arranging will be. Obviously, there is always going to be some of ALL of it (as there always has been a little of all of it in every time period), but it always seems like there is always one common trend that drives the time period.

Regardless of what the next new trend is, lets have some fun with this and talk about what our favorite multi-tonguing moments were of 2012. I know Crown had some great moments...a whole bunch in fact. Any others stick out?

Edited by stevedb1975

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Anyone notice how the checker board seems to change every several years in terms of brass writing trends. In the mid/late 90s pretty much through the mid 2000s, it was all about 16th note runs. Which arranger could out write the others with their running 16th note licks? And which hornlines could out perform all other hornline's runs? Lately, it seems like multi-tounging is the new trend (double and tripple tonguing). Corps still do runs of course but now the big contest is who can out articulate each other? Makes me wonder what the next new trend in brass arranging will be. Obviously, there is always going to be some of ALL of it (as there always has been a little of all of it in every time period), but it always seems like there is always one common trend that drives the time period.

Regardless of what the next new trend is, lets have some fun with this and talk about what our favorite multi-tonguing moments were of 2012. I know Crown had some great moments...a whole bunch in fact. Any others stick out?

I'm not a musician so I wouldn't know a 16th note run from a triple tongue if I heard one right after the other.

So, to give me a frame of reference, could you describe how the mello part at the end of Avian fits into all that stuff...if it even does?

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I'm not a musician so I wouldn't know a 16th note run from a triple tongue if I heard one right after the other.

So, to give me a frame of reference, could you describe how the mello part at the end of Avian fits into all that stuff...if it even does?

Unfortunately that wouldn't as it was mostly rips with 8th notes and a few triplet runs.

A good example of a 16th note run stunt would be around 0:50 in this video of cadets

And a good example of the double/triple tonguing would be this

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Some of my favorite double/triple tongue licks from the past few years:

Bloo 2010 (middle piece)

Boston 2010 (Shostakovich)

Crown 2009 (slalom - closer)

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Some of my favorite double/triple tongue licks from the past few years:

Bloo 2010 (middle piece)

Boston 2010 (Shostakovich)

Crown 2009 (slalom - closer)

St.Andrew's (Bayonne) Bridgemen 1972 "Mr. Clown"

:smile:

Fred O.

Edited by drumno5
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My issue with today's horn aranging trends is that it is technique for technique's sake. It has really spelled the death of melody for the most part. The mold one must fit into in order to be competative has little room for melodic development. The shows have become centered around visual development with musical accompanyment instead of the other way around. That is one reason I would rather watch BOA Grand Nationals than DCI finals. That is also the main reason I have grown to love Phantom so much over the last several years. They are one of the few corps that seem to take efforts to be sensitive to the melodic content of their genre. With so many modern corps, their shows seem to be a 13 minute brass technical study instead of a musical development and performance. I know it is old school, but I miss the days of the sanctity of a melodic line.

Just my opinion and I know that this view would not be a top 3 focal point.

Dan

I think you are dead on correct. Only I would move that to about 8-8.5 brass study, probably less as ensemble. Change will only come when it is not rewarded.

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My issue with today's horn aranging trends is that it is technique for technique's sake. It has really spelled the death of melody for the most part. The mold one must fit into in order to be competative has little room for melodic development. The shows have become centered around visual development with musical accompanyment instead of the other way around. That is one reason I would rather watch BOA Grand Nationals than DCI finals. That is also the main reason I have grown to love Phantom so much over the last several years. They are one of the few corps that seem to take efforts to be sensitive to the melodic content of their genre. With so many modern corps, their shows seem to be a 13 minute brass technical study instead of a musical development and performance. I know it is old school, but I miss the days of the sanctity of a melodic line.

Just my opinion and I know that this view would not be a top 3 focal point.

Dan

:worthy: :worthy: :worthy: :worthy: :worthy: :worthy: :worthy: :worthy: :worthy:

Amen brother, preach on!

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My issue with today's horn aranging trends is that it is technique for technique's sake. It has really spelled the death of melody for the most part. The mold one must fit into in order to be competative has little room for melodic development. The shows have become centered around visual development with musical accompanyment instead of the other way around. That is one reason I would rather watch BOA Grand Nationals than DCI finals. That is also the main reason I have grown to love Phantom so much over the last several years. They are one of the few corps that seem to take efforts to be sensitive to the melodic content of their genre. With so many modern corps, their shows seem to be a 13 minute brass technical study instead of a musical development and performance. I know it is old school, but I miss the days of the sanctity of a melodic line.

Just my opinion and I know that this view would not be a top 3 focal point.

Dan

YES YES YES! I feel like you said in less words what I was trying to say in the underrated horn lines thread!

And it's not just old school. It's more musical.

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Sometimes a melodic line doesn't showcase the performer, or generate any kind of musical or visual impact.

I would assume that a show designer is looking to showcase the strengths of their particular corps and they would want to write to accomplish that.

To me, smart arranging is writing a book that shows off your performers while not creating too much unnecessary risks.

I like original shows on the marching field and have never liked how phantom tries to bring pieces like Nessun Dorma to the field. Drum Corps needs to be doing new things, in every facet. If I want Nessun Dorma, I will watch the opera. I want something I havent heard or seen before!

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