KeithHall

What Year or Corps Changed Drum Corps?

17 posts in this topic

On 4/20/2017 at 6:52 PM, Fran Haring said:

All of the above!!! And I'll add these....

1969 Yankee Rebels and their "Requiem for an Era" color presentation production.  First use of a "split corps" and multiple tempos within one production.  Changed what was possible, from a music and visual standpoint. A template for SCV's "Young Person's Guide" several years later.

1969 Boston Crusaders and Long Island Sunrisers... bringing mallet instruments to the field. (One could also point to Preston Scout House and their use of glockenspiels, years before 1969.)

The advent of the "pit"... the front ensemble. Marching percussion has never been the same since.  (It's better now, IMO. Feel free to disagree. LOL)

 

Not sure about the "mallet instruments " to the field in '69 as a "watershed" year.  I think that besides Preston Scout House before '69, that Madison Scouts also used glocks in early '60s and late '50s, as many other corps, certainly here in Quebec.

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On 4/20/2017 at 6:52 PM, Fran Haring said:

All of the above!!! And I'll add these....

1969 Yankee Rebels and their "Requiem for an Era" color presentation production.  First use of a "split corps" and multiple tempos within one production.  Changed what was possible, from a music and visual standpoint. A template for SCV's "Young Person's Guide" several years later.

1969 Boston Crusaders and Long Island Sunrisers... bringing mallet instruments to the field. (One could also point to Preston Scout House and their use of glockenspiels, years before 1969.)

The advent of the "pit"... the front ensemble. Marching percussion has never been the same since.  (It's better now, IMO. Feel free to disagree. LOL)

 

I would suggest that, by definition, the pit is not marching percussion.

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11 minutes ago, IllianaLancerContra said:

I would suggest that, by definition, the pit is not marching percussion.

Sure... but it's within the realm of marching-music percussion, as opposed to, say, concert-hall percussion. Or "drum kit at your local jazz club" percussion.  :tongue:

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On 4/20/2017 at 5:52 PM, Fran Haring said:

All of the above!!! And I'll add these....

1969 Yankee Rebels and their "Requiem for an Era" color presentation production.  First use of a "split corps" and multiple tempos within one production.  Changed what was possible, from a music and visual standpoint. A template for SCV's "Young Person's Guide" several years later.

1969 Boston Crusaders and Long Island Sunrisers... bringing mallet instruments to the field. (One could also point to Preston Scout House and their use of glockenspiels, years before 1969.)

The advent of the "pit"... the front ensemble. Marching percussion has never been the same since.  (It's better now, IMO. Feel free to disagree. LOL)

 

The Madison Scouts used glockenspeils in the 1950s. The Quincy, IL Debutantes used a gong and a glock 1958 ('59?).

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So many changes over so many years... the Trooper's touring model; melodic percussion, poly-rhythmic shows, curve-linear drill, dance, costumes, props, amplification, ...Vietnam, cost of living, social media, VFW, Am. Leg., DCI, DCA...so many changes...each causing a ripple in the pond of drum corps.

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1982 Season. Garfield Cadets. I was visiting my cousin in Allendale, NJ and went down to watch George Zingali teach the whole corps the drill to Rocky Point Holiday in about 2 hours,Amazing teacher and still have not seen as good a drill writer.

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Blue Devils - pick a year, almost any year...

SCV - 70's - changed the music genre

Cadets - 83 - drill

Star - early 90s - solidified the modern era of drum corps

Crown - the new "Star"

Bluecoats - 2013 to present

 

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