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Grenadier

I must say.....

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On 4/21/2017 at 2:52 PM, BigW said:

 A lot of this reminds me of a conversation I had at DCI East prelims circa 1982-4... 33-35 years ago where someone complained about the Bridgemen, and I responded,

"Strip away the Pimp hats and Raincoats, all the extra stuff on the field, and put that show out raw musically and visually. Is the drill well written? Say it... YES. Are the Horns and drums well played and are the arrangements really, really good? Uhhhhhuhhhh... the basic elements are THERE."

I hear ya... those Bridgemen corps could flat-out play... fundamentally sound, no doubt about it. Honest to God, I thought they won DCI Finals in 1980. They were absolutely stellar that night.

And on the visual side... they took their share of heat for "not doing much drill"... but their visual show was exceptionally well-staged and coordinated.  It was like watching a Broadway show, with the horn line and drum line serving as sort of a backdrop "frame" for the color guard and the various storylines/scenarios/schtick that were woven in.

And like Bobby Hoffman once told me.... "All that 'spontaneous' stuff going on in our show... we spend a lot of time rehearsing that 'spontaneous' stuff."  They made it look easy... when it wasn't.

Edited by Fran Haring

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On 4/21/2017 at 2:52 PM, BigW said:

There's a reason that the style of the brass playing was different. Ticks. You played differently back then to be tick-proof. The style corps played was also bent to that. Being a bit more musical, bending things, phrasing more subtly, etc. meant a lot more of a risk of a tick.

Seems to me that this has always been true, whether tick or buildup.  In fact, hornlines became more conservative as/after the tick system went away.

Style is much more determined by the people creating it, and judging it.  When those people were military, so was the style of corps shows.  When musicians replaced the military men, corps became more musical.  As music educators took precedence, corps gravitated toward the music of academia.

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On 4/24/2017 at 7:37 AM, cixelsyd said:

Seems to me that this has always been true, whether tick or buildup.  In fact, hornlines became more conservative as/after the tick system went away.

Style is much more determined by the people creating it, and judging it.  When those people were military, so was the style of corps shows.  When musicians replaced the military men, corps became more musical.  As music educators took precedence, corps gravitated toward the music of academia.

And then, it seemed, the crowds went away....

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As a Music Educator, I really don't like the smell of that old saw that "Them daggone Music Teachin' types wrecked the activity and no one likes it anymore!!!!"

 

I went into the field largely because of my experiences in the marching Arts. Okay?

 

I'll get into my thoughts on the subject later, but to be blunt... I really loathe and detest that insinuation.

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