Recommended Posts

30 minutes ago, Grenadier said:

Don't bother because you ignorant of the facts.  There use to be dozens of corps on Long Island.  The Skyliners, Sunrisers, Smithtown Freelancers and Plebes, the Golden Grenadiers, Portsman, Czechmates, West Sayville Golden Eagles, the Lindenhurst Legionaires, and dozens more.  Now there is only one corps on Long Island, the Sunrisers.  Explain that HBD!  If drum corps is alive and well.  Why does in not exist on an island with over 2 million people.  Get over yourself.

 

 

There are a hell of a lot more excellent scholastic programs in those areas now than there were in your day too. That's where the kids went.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Kamarag said:

 

There are a hell of a lot more excellent scholastic programs in those areas now than there were in your day too. That's where the kids went.

Like you know.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Grenadier said:

Like you know.....

Uh...yes? Kinda been doing this a while...

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On a parallel, the BBC reality series "A Band for Britain" describes the plight of the British Brass Band moment. If anything, their collapse might be worse than that of Drum Corps- especially since they really have no school bands.

 

"Thirty years ago (that's around 1984) there were over twenty thousand brass bands playing across Britain, today, less then five hundred survive, many of which are facing closure." That's a 97.5 percent+ mortality rate. And this has happened well after the big collapse of Drum Corps which took place around 1968-1971.

 

For those unaware, they are extremely competitive, ridiculously good at the top level, and have rather fascinating and restricted rules in place- incidentally designed to keep people like John and myself out of it unless we're conductors. (there were a lot of ringers in these bands in their heyday. Someone like myself might even have a 'desk job' at a factory sponsored band, and quietly told to just show up ready for practice...) No one with a music degree is allowed to perform-only conduct. In the US and Canada the restriction is relaxed in that the performer can't derive over half their income as a performing musician. I asked why at a North American Brass Band Championship back around 1985 and I was told with a shrug "We'd have not enough individuals capable of playing the literature in our bands in the US to fill the seats. Most of the band members happen to have degrees." They only have 33 bands across the US and Canada in six classes. Less than DCA and DCI combined by my guess. So, keeping out "Those guys" has been a great deal in keeping the Brass Band activity alive and vibrant in the UK, hmm? Even though the model is much like the way Drum Corps was in the mid-50's. Even though the British Brass Band is about the most quintessentially British thing there is in existence.

 

I appreciate John's comments here- It's why I get out and talk to the kids, staffs, and help out with the T-Birds. I feel that wringing my hands at where things are going isn't going to help. Taking some kind of positive action will help keep what there is in the activity vibrant. And I will not be a hypocrite. I get out there as best I can.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know why I bothered BUT I googled an article written by an association of music educators on Long Island where it commented that there is over 50 competing bands and at least the same amount that just perform halftime shows, It was an article about the health and benefits  of Long Island marching band programs . That's at least 100 programs where kids are getting a music education and having the chance to experience the thrill of competition. But WTF do I know? I'm ignorant of the facts!

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎7‎/‎22‎/‎2017 at 7:15 PM, HBD said:

 But WTF do I know? I'm ignorant of the facts!

Apparently, not much about drum corps on Long Island!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Grenadier said:

Apparently, not much about drum corps on Long Island!

He actually knows quite a bit about Long Island drum corps. Deep family roots in NY-area corps.

 

Edited by Fran Haring
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Fran Haring said:

He actually knows quite a bit about Long Island drum corps. Deep family roots in NY-area corps.

 

Frank, respectfully, there is no longer any Long Island drum corps.  With the exception of the Sunrisers.

Edited by Grenadier
Grammar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Grenadier said:

Frank, respectfully, there is no longer any Long Island drum corps.  With the exception of the Sunrisers.

I'm aware of that. Sad, yet true. A chapter of our past... closed.

My comment was directed at the poster's knowledge of the history of Long Island/NYC area corps. Trust me... he knows the history, quite well.

And he is correct that there are plenty of marching bands and marching-music opportunities for kids on the Island, and I agree with him and the others... that's a very good thing for those kids.

A different era... and the old one is not coming back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/22/2017 at 4:14 PM, BigW said:

On a parallel, the BBC reality series "A Band for Britain" describes the plight of the British Brass Band moment. If anything, their collapse might be worse than that of Drum Corps- especially since they really have no school bands.

 

"Thirty years ago (that's around 1984) there were over twenty thousand brass bands playing across Britain, today, less then five hundred survive, many of which are facing closure." That's a 97.5 percent+ mortality rate. And this has happened well after the big collapse of Drum Corps which took place around 1968-1971.

 

For those unaware, they are extremely competitive, ridiculously good at the top level, and have rather fascinating and restricted rules in place- incidentally designed to keep people like John and myself out of it unless we're conductors. (there were a lot of ringers in these bands in their heyday. Someone like myself might even have a 'desk job' at a factory sponsored band, and quietly told to just show up ready for practice...) No one with a music degree is allowed to perform-only conduct. In the US and Canada the restriction is relaxed in that the performer can't derive over half their income as a performing musician. I asked why at a North American Brass Band Championship back around 1985 and I was told with a shrug "We'd have not enough individuals capable of playing the literature in our bands in the US to fill the seats. Most of the band members happen to have degrees." They only have 33 bands across the US and Canada in six classes. Less than DCA and DCI combined by my guess. So, keeping out "Those guys" has been a great deal in keeping the Brass Band activity alive and vibrant in the UK, hmm? Even though the model is much like the way Drum Corps was in the mid-50's. Even though the British Brass Band is about the most quintessentially British thing there is in existence.

 

I appreciate John's comments here- It's why I get out and talk to the kids, staffs, and help out with the T-Birds. I feel that wringing my hands at where things are going isn't ginger to help. Taking some kind of positive action will help keep what there is in the activity vibrant. And I will not be a hypocrite. I get out there as best I can.

...that's why you're the bada$$ you are Tony!  Missed seeing you this year, brother...keep up the good work, I'm doing my part as well!

cg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.