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With the Cadets a shoo-in for 7th tonight, their lowest placement in 36 years, where do they go from this flawed yet enjoyable show to medal in 2018? What has to change music, drill, staff, and design wise?

Let's get this ball rolling. I believe in you, Cadets!

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It will be another Bernstein show . . . same for 2019.

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16 minutes ago, Hrothgar15 said:

With the Cadets a shoo-in for 7th tonight, their lowest placement in 36 years, where do they go from this flawed yet enjoyable show to medal in 2018? What has to change music, drill, staff, and design wise?

Let's get this ball rolling. I believe in you, Cadets!

You beat me to it :(

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Crazier things have happened, I wouldn't call it a shoe in just yet. I'm rooting for them to pull ahead! If they can get the reward they deserve for this outstanding product, they may very well pull ahead. Crusaders were for sure 13th at this point in semis last year. And then they played on Saturday night!

I'm so excited that THIS show is their "transition" show, the fact that they are doing this well after losing so much in one off season is a testament to this new staff, the marching members, and their volunteers and supporters!

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I still thinks it's ironic how the Cadets, in an attempt to become more modern, have fallen to their lowest finish in a LONG time. They placed much higher with their "out of date" style in past years 

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1 minute ago, DawsonBurnes said:

I still thinks it's ironic how the Cadets, in an attempt to become more modern, have fallen to their lowest finish in a LONG time. They placed much higher with their "out of date" style in past years 

They finished high with more "stock" shows because of their incredible talent and vet/staff retention. If they had a show similar to Power of 10 with this young corps, we might be asking if The Cadets were going to make finals. This was a GOOD step.

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6 minutes ago, George Dixon said:

Gail Royer (SCV) did this best - he used to write drill, develop the show, music etc - but in later years he stepped back a bit and let the teaching and design team take the lead. He was still "around" to help solve a problem or offer advice when needed. Hopkins references SCV as an early inspiration for him as a director and as a corps. Use this example.

THAT is what leaders do. You build a framework to make others successful and you continue to improve that framework.

from DCI.org:

In March of 1967, Gail Royer, a Santa Clara, Calif.-based elementary school music teacher, was named director of a new drum corps that spun off from the Sparks, another local drum corps. One week later that corps, named the Vanguard, would win its first parade, and that corps would evolve into the single-most influential drum corps of the 1970s.

Royer was one of the charter members of the DCI board of directors, which formed in 1972, and went on to become one of DCI's first board of directors chairmen.

In 1973, Royer's corps was defeated just once -- the Troopers bested them at an early season contest. That season was capped by the corps' first World Championship victory.

Royer's contribution to the drum corps era can be measured by the creativity he sparked within DCI. Under his leadership, the Santa Clara Vanguard pushed the boundaries of the music and visual captions. Royer wrote the corps brass book himself, while DCI Hall of Famer Fred Sanford composed the percussion book and fellow Hall of Famer Pete Emmons wrote the drill.

"Gail's major contribution to the drum corps activity was that he heard the sound of drum corps differently than everyone else," said Mike Moxley, former director of the Blue Devils. Moxley was a 4th-grade clarinet and oboe player when he met Royer, who directed Moxley's school band.

Royer's influence on drum corps can also be measured by the support staff he continually hired to lead the corps. His instructional staff reads like a who's who of the DCI Hall of Fame: Gary Czapinski, Sanford, Emmons, Ralph Hardimon and Wayne Downey. "He got the right people in there, and let them do what they did best," said DCI Hall of Famer Gene Monterastelli.

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Jeez didn't even let them perform at finals yet...

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