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leed17

Video edits 2017

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6 hours ago, leed17 said:

2008 has Phantom Regiment edited...I don't remember edits earlier than that year.  I think it was around then that things started to get more complicated for DCI in regards to licensing...

2015 has some edits - I think if you go to the DCI store and click on the years you want they list the edits that were done (although 2017 doesn't have the edits listed, you have to go to a different spot on their website to see those).  Get the Essentials volumes while you can - I believe they are already sold out of Vol. 1.

 

And 2008 was edited after the fact. The initial release of the dvds were complete before they had to make the edits if I recall correctly.

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21 hours ago, jjeffeory said:

Once the signal goes analog, that won't work...  ..and it has to go analog at some point to get to your eyes.  There are tons of apps that get past that, especially on the PC.

On the audio side digital audio information still has to be converted to an analog signal through a DA converter in order for the signal to drive the external speakers; and in the old analog TV, CRT, VHS days the video signal itself had to be analog for the TV/CRT/VCR to pick it up and produce the picture. And for those who still use analog TVs, CRTs, and VCRs there has to be an external DA video conversion prior to the signal being transmitted to the TV/CRT/VCR,. (and it is in the external DA video conversion realm where video piracy still occurs because DA conversion can go back through an AD converter thus bypassing any embedded digital code). However, in Digital Broadcast, HD, DVD, Blur-Ray, Mp4, as well as Digital Streaming, where LED and LCD monitors are used the video signal stays digital all the way to the monitor and the pixels within the monitor convert the digital information directly to light waves (technically analog but light waves are different than sound waves).  Thus while digital code in audio is lost in the DA converter prior to going to the speakers, and the analog audio signal can then be recorded, the digital video code stays intact all the way to the monitor producing the light waves. It is in that realm where proprietary code can be embedded to prevent or scramble recording of the video.  The technology exists but it will not be effective as long as there are after market DA back into AD video converters being sold due to there still being so many analog TVs, CRTs, and VCRs in use around the world.

Edited by Stu

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51 minutes ago, Narrow said:

When's DCI going to post the previews on youtube?

Image result for best smiley emoji

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2 hours ago, Stu said:

On the audio side digital audio information still has to be converted to an analog signal through a DA converter in order for the signal to drive the external speakers; and in the old analog TV, CRT, VHS days the video signal itself had to be analog for the TV/CRT/VCR to pick it up and produce the picture. And for those who still use analog TVs, CRTs, and VCRs there has to be an external DA video conversion prior to the signal being transmitted to the TV/CRT/VCR,. (and it is in the external DA video conversion realm where video piracy still occurs because DA conversion can go back through an AD converter thus bypassing any embedded digital code). However, in Digital Broadcast, HD, DVD, Blur-Ray, Mp4, as well as Digital Streaming, where LED and LCD monitors are used the video signal stays digital all the way to the monitor and the pixels within the monitor convert the digital information directly to light waves (technically analog but light waves are different than sound waves).  Thus while digital code in audio is lost in the DA converter prior to going to the speakers, and the analog audio signal can then be recorded, the digital video code stays intact all the way to the monitor producing the light waves. It is in that realm where proprietary code can be embedded to prevent or scramble recording of the video.  The technology exists but it will not be effective as long as there are after market DA back into AD video converters being sold due to there still being so many analog TVs, CRTs, and VCRs in use around the world.

 

There are solutions that circumvent all the protection, create virtual monitors and audio endpoints, where the protection is then stripped away and the image and streams are gotten.  There are quite a few people who get the DCI streams without edits, and can watch the forever.

DVD has been cracked, Bluray has been cracked, and every digital streaming method has been cracked.  

 

 

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10 hours ago, jjeffeory said:

 

There are solutions that circumvent all the protection, create virtual monitors and audio endpoints, where the protection is then stripped away and the image and streams are gotten.  There are quite a few people who get the DCI streams without edits, and can watch the forever.

DVD has been cracked, Bluray has been cracked, and every digital streaming method has been cracked.  

 

 

And those who cracked the the codes deserve to be thrown in jail; and those who use the info should be heavily fined.

As for live streaming the anti-recording code can be different each stream or can randomly switch mid-stream making it harder to crack. That is why most pirating in that realm takes place post DA conversion.

Edited by Stu

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There is no 100% effective technological deterrent to piracy.  There's just not.  Bigger industries than our little corner of music have tried and failed a thousand times over.  Music, movies, video games, live streams, paid live sports, even satellite broadcasts.  However, you can limit the desire for pirated material and gut the black market pretty effectively.  Case in point directly from our interest - DCI implemented the all-you-can-eat Fan Network, and IRC and BitTorrent files disappeared almost entirely during the first year.  Again, not limited to drum corps - iTunes massively disrupted mainstream music piracy when it was introduced.

Mike

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Anyone crack 4K bluray yet?

What I read about it I hate as even the connecting cable are proprietary, I understand you can’t even watch it off-line. I feel it’s a maybe a platform killing move as I know a bunch of tech a/v nerds that bought  the last issues of  a top of the line UDP as back ups to avoid 4K altogether, telling as they are usually in line for the latest and greatest

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3 hours ago, cowtown said:

Anyone crack 4K bluray yet?

What I read about it I hate as even the connecting cable are proprietary, I understand you can’t even watch it off-line. I feel it’s a maybe a platform killing move as I know a bunch of tech a/v nerds that bought  the last issues of  a top of the line UDP as back ups to avoid 4K altogether, telling as they are usually in line for the latest and greatest

So ... you hate it because you can't as of yet pirate and steal other people's intellectual property.

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