Timplan

Contributions to Innovation

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Here is one that might stir up some controversy:

Among the "Multi-finalists" (defined 5+) of DCI's "Classic" era (defined 1972 - 80), which corps contributed the LEAST toward overall growth and creative innovation in our activity, during that era?

That is, maybe "played it safe".

Consider advancement in all aspects -- design, teaching, performance, and administration. Brass, Percussion, Visual (drill, guard, body movement etc.), management, equipment inventions and the like.

I have always had a firm idea (hint: The group continues today), even going way back to my thoughts during this actual era.

SCV 9

Blue Stars 8

27th 8

Madison 8

Bayonne 7

Devils 7

Cavaliers 7

Phantom 7

Kilts 6

Troopers 5

 

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On 11/27/2017 at 8:15 PM, Timplan said:

 

Here is one that might stir up some controversy:

 

 

 Well, so far the topic selected has generated no " controversy " at all. Mostly, its collected just " non interest ".

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OK, I'll go . . . 

Blue Stars.  Always solid, but not innovators.

No disrespect intended.  During the old LP era, I always enjoyed listening to their music.  But the entire package didn't do as much for me.

 

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6 hours ago, Timplan said:

OK, I'll go . . . 

Blue Stars.  Always solid, but not innovators.

No disrespect intended.  During the old LP era, I always enjoyed listening to their music.  But the entire package didn't do as much for me.

 

I'm a longtime Blue Stars fan, and I would have to agree with you here.

Great corps throughout DCI's formative years... but not necessarily at the "innovation" level of SCV and Blue Devils, among others.

However, Bobby Hoffman's visual design for the Blue Stars in 1975 (not sure if he wrote for them any other years) was really cool and ahead of its time, IMO.

One could make a case for leaving the Troopers off the 1970s "innovation" list... even though in the 1960s, they broke significant new ground with their "national touring" concept and their now-legendary "Sunburst" visual.  And Jim Jones was one of the all-time great drum corps administrators.

 

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Yes, that's why I put Troopers a bit ahead -- the business model.

I did see some '75 video a few months back, for first time ever, because I didn't start following the activity until 1976.  It impressed me, how far the corps had come in 3 years, and how the new creative freedom of DCI had unleashed lots of ideas.  I had really only been aware of programs like SCV, 27th and Madison.

Had forgotten about the Bobby Hoffman connection.  But even the mid-level Finalists back in '75, like Blue Stars, Oakland and Royal Crusaders were quite solid and entertaining.

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The Norwood Park Imperials were doing a sunburst maneuver in 1959. The tune was "Daybreak." They may have done this in '58 too.

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I'd have to put the Bridgemen up there on the "innovation" list for their on-field accomplishments... from the triple-tonguing brass in the early 1970s St. Andrew's days, to the game-changing "new look" Bridgemen, circa 1976 and beyond.

Bridgemen's management was not at the level of more sophisticated operations like Blue Devils, SCV, and Troopers... NOT a knock on the Bridgemen, they weren't the only "Mom and Pop"-style operation among the top corps of those days.  But IMO, what they might have lacked in management expertise, they certainly made up with hard work, determination, creativity, and at times, sheer chutzpah.  LOL. 

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"Inovators":

Can you say Mickey Petrone, James Donnelly and Vinnie Cerbonne?  They were the "Team" that mafe the legendary St Vincents Cadets of Bayonne NJ THE "Inovator" of the late 1940's and through the 1950's, not to mention many times national champion of the VFW and American Legion.

Mickey was to that era's drill as Jim Jones, Pete Emmons and George Zingale were in the marching revolutions that came later, and James Donnelly and Vincent Cerbonne were to that era of drum corps as Wayne Downey, Bobby Thompson and Jerry Shelmer were to later generations.

Along with pioneering many drill inovations, the National Dream Contest was the brainchild of the late Mr Petrone.  This paved the way for several other "Indie" championships such as the World Open and CYO Nationals.

Elphaba    :flower:

Edited by elphaba01

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Regarding Blue Stars, performing Mennin's "Canzona" in the mid 70's was pretty cutting edge for that era. Recent dealings with an individual on DCP would indicate from them that awful music of that sort from those overly edjamacated wind band people destroyed the activity. At least in some ways Blue Stars led the activity down the slippery slope to ruin. :laugh:

 

I think one has to consider that perhaps in terms of musical innovation... what we hear then may not be thought of as particularly innovative when it actually was for its day.

 

I sense an underlying thought in the premise--- that people on top didn't feel as much a need to innovate as the ones who had to do something more aggressive to get noticed and make finals? (read as perhaps Kilties, Optimists as examples?)

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