Dan Guernsey

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About Dan Guernsey

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    DCP Rookie
  • Birthday 03/05/1956

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    Miami, Florida

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  1. Yep, we were poised to take it but it just didn't happen. Perhaps what happened to us in '74 was similar to what happened to you guys at '72 finals. In any event, SCV was the better corps that night in '74 and deserved the win. As for the flag, a guy from our guard took it that night; I had heard that it was recently returned. I talked briefly to Gary Czapinski this past weekend in Madison. I know that he worked with both SCV and MS in the early 1970s. I asked him point blank who came up with the "Alice" concept in '71. He said it was his idea and sold Ray Baumgardt on it. Larry McCormick wa
  2. On the "Brass Roots" video there is semi-slow motion shot of the '73 Kingsmen guard work--at the very beginning of "Folksong Suite," seen from a worms-eye perspective. I believe it is a clip from Bluegrass Invitational that year. I get chills ever time I see it: some of the coolest friggin guard work I've ever seen. Total rush! . . . 1974 Kingsmen--arguably my all-time favorite show (behind my beloved Scouts, of course). Enjoyed it as well! Your welcome, Ron. Enjoy! I'm sure we'll run into each other. Dan
  3. You right, Ron. SCV and MS were in alot of the same shows in 1971 and 1972, and not just at the big regional shows. Those were the days when the west coast corps had to come frequently to the midwest. Of course, we did the same in 1971 and 1972, competing in Wyoming, Drums Along the Rockies, and even went to CA in 1972. So, we had alot of opportunities to meet each other socially. We even had chances to watch SCV practice. I remember in 1972 watching Fred S. run a drum line rehersal; one could tell right then and there that a new era of drum corps had started. Madison is a fun city. I'm sorry
  4. Hi Paul, Glad to hear from a '71 vet--'71 SCV was my favorite show that year, especially the opener--Globe Playhouse. The opening statement to that piece blew me away. Yep, you remembered correctly. We owned an old firehouse on the east side of Madison on Atwood Ave. It was torn town sometime in the mid-70s. I remember doing it in 1973 at the Madison show. You're speaking of Jeff Tosef, a cymbal player: arguably the shortest guy in the corrps. He was the logical choice to play the rabbit. Yep, you're speaking of Karson and Kelly Klund who owned the bar, "The Stone Hearth," a favori
  5. Ron, I was on the left side of the field most of the time--hard to pick out on the video. As for names, we didn't have any, except if someone "ticked." In that case, you can imagine what dwarf name he was called, lol. Dan
  6. Ask and you shall receive. Wikipedia's take on it: You can throw in Hugh Hefner's "Playboy Bunny" logo as a potent symbol of the "free love" movement back then. The bunny symbolism indeed had a wide resonance in American popular culture, denoting individual freedom in its various manifestations. The rabbit in "Alice in Wonderland" and in Jefferson Starship=quest for creative liberation, while Hefner's Playboy rabbit=sexual liberation.
  7. Well, being from Madison was part of the problem, lol! . . . But, Bill Howard didn't identify our Alice show with the anti-war/counter culture movement. Actually, quite the opposite. He wanted to instill wholesome fun and entertainment into drum corps, not invite subversive youth rebellion ("Magical Mystery Tour" via drug use). I only brought in the more subversive treatments of "Alice in Wonderland" for context and perspective, not to suggest there was a causal connection. I just wanted to note how popular Alice was at that time in the wider culture and how it could be used in various ways--e
  8. Ask and you shall receive. Wikipedia's take on it: Makes perfect sense. Thanks for the added info, Sue. Dan
  9. Well, we PLAYED "White Rabbit" in 1970...our initial Peace Sign music. Mike Yeah, Mike, the stars and planets were aligned in strange ways in 1970 and 1971. Rabbit symbolism seemed to be part of the counter culture movement back then. Obviously, you had Garfield's more overt anti-war statement with the rabbit motif. But, also in a curious way, our '71 Alice show via the rabbit image fit the rebellious mood of the times. In the drum corps context, that meant rebelling against authorative rules and hierachy through subversive "kids play." Specifically what the rabbit means as a rebellious sym
  10. Hey Ron, there were a couple of guys who wore hairnets; one guy, if I recall, had a wig. I remember while dressing for VFW inspection seeing these guys tuck that stuff inside the small envelop hats--even hair pins were used. It was a real hoot watching it! Long hair wasn't prevalent in the '71 Scouts--that would change by 1973-1975. Yep, you can attribute that to Ray Baumgardt. The master of the low voice and balanced use of solos, small ensemble, and big full ensemble. One of my favorite Baumgardt charts from the early 70s is the Scouts's 1970 concert piece, "Black is the Color of My True
  11. From my recollection, "Alice" did not take a penalty, at least not during the field show. Bill Howard's daughter played the role of Alice. Next time I see him, I'll ask Bill how she factored into VFW inspection, if at all. We did have a few deductions during inspection (about .4)--I'll find out if she was the source of any deductions. We indeed had to scrap our costumes for '71 VFW Nationals. However, we kept the other unconventional drill moves--the scatter drill and simulated movement of robotic toy soldiers during "March of the Wooden Soldiers," both of which we did at 1970 VFW in Miami.
  12. Butterflies hit this 15 year-old kid at 1971 VFW Nationals: "On the starting line, representing Lt. Marion E. Cranfield Post, no. 1318 . . . from Madison, Wisconsin the Madison Explorer Scouts."
  13. He was the assistant to Drum Major John Schrack. Thanks for clearing some of those faulty memory banks. I stand corrected. Doug played bari from 1971-1976, was Assistant DM in 1977, and DM in 1978. MYNWA
  14. Hey, we didn't have to raid. We were babe magnets, lol! Dan