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Most complicated brass book

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Brass books that get me all moist and tingly (off the top of my head, hardly a comprehensive list):

Spirit 1980

27th 1981

Cadets 1982, 1985

PR 1993, 1996

BD 1988, 1989 (I'm listening to these to a LOT lately)

Crown 2009

Edited by jthomas666
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In terms of complicated chord structure and a tough listening environment, 2010 and 2013 BD for sure.

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This never gets mentioned but the book that Michael Klesch wrote for Phantom Regiment in 2001 was quite good,

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In terms of complicated chord structure and a tough listening environment, 2010 and 2013 BD for sure.

2010 BD gets my vote

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Based on 84BDSop’s comments

Criteria: book difficulty, staging, performance.

To name a few...

Spirit of Atlanta - 79

Star of Indiana - 90, 91, 93

Madison Scouts - 81, 84, 85, 86, 88, 99

Blue Devils - 79, 91, 93, 96, 99, 10, 14

Cavaliers - 00, 01, 06

Cadets - 87, 97

Phantom Regiment - 78, 79, 84, 94, 96, 06

Carolina Crown - 10, 12

Edited by devsabre

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Praise only for Crown, guys...

Nice, kdaddy. And I'm not even an alumnus. :smile::smile::smile:

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Just to be a moron, but I'd like to throw in PARTS of BD '85. In particular, the "Litreraft Earth" opening. I took me a long, long time to get my ears around that -- believe me, a LONG time. However, with many repeated listenings, it suddenly occurred to me that the opening 40 seconds were really a portend of what was to become with DC scoring and effect. The "tonic-mediant-supertonic" slide at approximately the 30-second mark...the soprano line glissando at the 40-45 second mark -- I see these as a portend of Drum Corps scoring changing from the heavily "song inspired" medium which had ruled the roost to a more "effect medium" scoring which would eventually take over the activity.

I'll even subjugate myself to those BD experts to the charges of "You don't know S*** "" which may come along. That's just the way I interpret the opening....AFTER about 250 listenings (or more;, if that's possible). For me...it's a ground-breaking moment in DCI from the musical scoring perspective.

Edited by HornTeacher

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If taken in the context of the era and the instruments being used, the 1985 Garfield Cadets brass book is about as ridiculous as it gets.

Absolutely. Given these variables, that book was incomparable:

* Not written until March (SCV's book was written by the past November---well, two parts were written in late 1983)

* Written by M. Klesch, who had NEVER written a 13 minute book before

* Not even on the field until April

* Garfield was dirt-poor and had notoriously bad horns

* Two friggin' valves

* TO THIS DAY, the most demanding, exposed drill. Jeremiah is so time signature-sick that at times, they marched on the phrase. They either made the sets or they didn't. (They did.)

* The "opera buffo" ending to 'Candide' kept going and going. Louder, faster, higher. I asked then; I ask now: HOW did they maintain the energy?

* BD second in Brass GE (14.3); Garfield got a 14.8. 'Nuff said.

* SCV got a 14.1 (they forgot about Ensemble/Timing in Finals). GR Royer said, "We got done in by a brass judge." Um, ok.

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