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I wish I knew what this means. :rock:

OK, Heh, here ya' go...

Count sixteenth notes (one, ee, and, aah) in 180 time. Now split every other note so that half the line (or every other player) is only playing the "one" and the "and" and the opposite players are only playing the "ee" and the "aah" of each beat in the measure (a "split"). Now imagine doing it while alternating your sticks (a double-handed split). Suffice it to say that keeping 10 players in time splitting rhythms is incredibly difficult and they do it not once, but 4 times in that 3 1/2 minutes, at 180bpm,

They did it twice for four counts, one for 3 counts and at least one double-handed.

It's kind of like how the bass drums "Split" five-sixteenth notes between them - I know you've heard it - but with snares and only two splits parts (instead of five as in basses).

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^^^ I think he means the percussion are doing slot of hard stuff well in feb.

LOL

Yea, that's it. Thanks.

lol

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I wish I knew what this means. :rock:

They are certainly playing a fistful of notes....no shortage of fast hands...but. I think the latter is true of the top lines most years. I will be really interested to see and hear how it comes together in support of the musical phrasing in the brass.

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OK, Heh, here ya' go...

Count sixteenth notes (one, ee, and, aah) in 180 time. Now split every other note so that half the line (or every other player) is only playing the "one" and the "and" and the opposite players are only playing the "ee" and the "aah" of each beat in the measure (a "split"). Now imagine doing it while alternating your sticks (a double-handed split). Suffice it to say that keeping 10 players in time splitting rhythms is incredibly difficult and they do it not once, but 4 times in that 3 1/2 minutes, at 180bpm,

They did it twice for four counts, one for 3 counts and at least one double-handed.

It's kind of like how the bass drums "Split" five-sixteenth notes between them - I know you've heard it - but with snares and only two splits parts (instead of five as in basses).

I've never understood how percussionists can read music so fast. I was a woodwind player who got plenty of sixteenth and 32nd note runs or just funky rythyms in general and I'd always have trouble just getting my eyes to keep track of the notes as they'd go by at higher tempos. Just thinking about the precision needed to pull off what you just described boggles my mind.

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I've never understood how percussionists can read music so fast. I was a woodwind player who got plenty of sixteenth and 32nd note runs or just funky rythyms in general and I'd always have trouble just getting my eyes to keep track of the notes as they'd go by at higher tempos. Just thinking about the precision needed to pull off what you just described boggles my mind.

If it weren't for the pulse I'd never keep up. This piece shifts from 4/4 to 3/4 to 5/4 and back several times. And the splits aren't the really impressive parts - it's the writing! Brichtimp is curious how the percussion matches the horn book and, I can tell you for sure, that drum book matches the horn book perfectly. If they can clean it...

But, oh my, what a book....

EDIT: oh, and I should say what the book ISN'T. Not a lot of rim-shots or gratuitous slams for effect as well as what it is: GREAT dynamic styling (watch for the sticks to move to the edge of the drum head, writing as difficult in piano passages as at forte, AMAZING full height (stick beads almost vertical; it takes more time for the stick to reach the head so more power on the downstroke is necessary to stay in time), diddles and drags (single grace notes and double grace notes [a "ruff" in drum-speak) at full tempo in the middle of sixteenth-note triplets, and exactly similar stick heights along with full feet at 180.

I'm telling you, as an old drummer with a young hotshot kid - this is an amazing drum book.

Edited by garfield
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OK, Heh, here ya' go...

Count sixteenth notes (one, ee, and, aah) in 180 time. Now split every other note so that half the line (or every other player) is only playing the "one" and the "and" and the opposite players are only playing the "ee" and the "aah" of each beat in the measure (a "split"). Now imagine doing it while alternating your sticks (a double-handed split). Suffice it to say that keeping 10 players in time splitting rhythms is incredibly difficult and they do it not once, but 4 times in that 3 1/2 minutes, at 180bpm,

They did it twice for four counts, one for 3 counts and at least one double-handed.

It's kind of like how the bass drums "Split" five-sixteenth notes between them - I know you've heard it - but with snares and only two splits parts (instead of five as in basses).

Thanks for the explanation. Now I really have to pay attention to the drumline.

I've never understood how percussionists can read music so fast. I was a woodwind player who got plenty of sixteenth and 32nd note runs or just funky rythyms in general and I'd always have trouble just getting my eyes to keep track of the notes as they'd go by at higher tempos. Just thinking about the precision needed to pull off what you just described boggles my mind.

I say that all the time.

If it weren't for the pulse I'd never keep up. This piece shifts from 4/4 to 3/4 to 5/4 and back several times. And the splits aren't the really impressive parts - it's the writing! Brichtimp is curious how the percussion matches the horn book and, I can tell you for sure, that drum book matches the horn book perfectly. If they can clean it...

But, oh my, what a book....

EDIT: oh, and I should say what the book ISN'T. Not a lot of rim-shots or gratuitous slams for effect as well as what it is: GREAT dynamic styling (watch for the sticks to move to the edge of the drum head, writing as difficult in piano passages as at forte, AMAZING full height (stick beads almost vertical; it takes more time for the stick to reach the head so more power on the downstroke is necessary to stay in time), diddles and drags (single grace notes and double grace notes [a "ruff" in drum-speak) at full tempo in the middle of sixteenth-note triplets, and exactly similar stick heights along with full feet at 180.

I'm telling you, as an old drummer with a young hotshot kid - this is an amazing drum book.

Yeah as a trumpet player, all I can say is they look like they're playing a lot of stuff.

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Thanks for the explanation. Now I really have to pay attention to the drumline.

I say that all the time.

Yeah as a trumpet player, all I can say is they look like they're playing a lot of stuff.

About what I'd expect from a brass player.

:tounge2:

It's a good thing we have drummers as drum judges, eh?

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About what I'd expect from a brass player.

:tounge2:

It's a good thing we have drummers as drum judges, eh?

Pretty much because I probably would have my 5 year old nephew winning the Fred Sanford trophy.

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If it weren't for the pulse I'd never keep up. This piece shifts from 4/4 to 3/4 to 5/4 and back several times. And the splits aren't the really impressive parts - it's the writing! Brichtimp is curious how the percussion matches the horn book and, I can tell you for sure, that drum book matches the horn book perfectly. If they can clean it...

But, oh my, what a book....

EDIT: oh, and I should say what the book ISN'T. Not a lot of rim-shots or gratuitous slams for effect as well as what it is: GREAT dynamic styling (watch for the sticks to move to the edge of the drum head, writing as difficult in piano passages as at forte, AMAZING full height (stick beads almost vertical; it takes more time for the stick to reach the head so more power on the downstroke is necessary to stay in time), diddles and drags (single grace notes and double grace notes [a "ruff" in drum-speak) at full tempo in the middle of sixteenth-note triplets, and exactly similar stick heights along with full feet at 180.

I'm telling you, as an old drummer with a young hotshot kid - this is an amazing drum book.

That nicely describes a McNutt drum book. I got plenty of peeks at last year's book (via my son), and similar technical control and demand were part of the deal, as well as having to cut through frequently from the back part of the field. These kids can read well, and they get comfortable with sorting through complex rhythmic passages that would have many top pro players heading for the practice room.

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Pretty much because I probably would have my 5 year old nephew winning the Fred Sanford trophy.

Ha! Dude, I'm living it!

What a hoot to see the youngins take over where the old man left off!

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