2016 DCI World Championship Finals - 8/13/2016


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It's been this way for decades.

Literally decades.

50 percent content. 50 percent execution.

You are asserting that GE is purely the former and the other captions are purely the latter. They aren't.

This is factually incorrect. Let's break it down:

First of all (and really most importantly, regardless of any other analysis below), the GE judges' scores and spreads are not halved to arrive at the final score. So, they already have a much greater weight on decision making than the other captions do.

Secondly, you can look at the subcaptions and arrive at a 50/50 split. One must know that "performance" in GE is not the same as "achievement" in Visual Analysis and Music Analysis, nor are either of those the same as "achievement" in Visual Proficiency, Music-Brass and Music-Percussion. On top of it all, "achievement" in Color Guard is a different mix as well. The closest you'll find to an "execution" caption are in VisProf, Brass and Percussion.

Third, DCI came out before last season and pronounced the legitimization of "caption bleed", where they've given license to ALL judges to consider factors other than what may be listed on their sheet, in their evaluation process. In essence, they've allowed GE to permeate and color the other captions, at least to the extent that a judge will allow it. How much impact has this had on the system and results? It's anyone's guess...and depending on how much a judge does consider "GE" factors, it can swing results and scores from show to show.

So, it's a strange brew, the system, DCI edicts on caption bleed, and the judges that live in it. Hard to really pin a number on it, but my best guess is about 55% GE to start, plus whatever individual judges will allow above a healthy balance in their caption. As mentioned above, the GE people will always have double the impact individually over technical captions.

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I'm trying to type things, but I can't. My head hurts. What an AMAZING evening. Congrats to everyone, from Bluecoats on their first championship, to Blue Devils on your amazing professionalism and

Going to my first Finals ever today with my girl! Leaving at about 11... Excited to get my first taste of Shapiro's. :D Thanks DCP for teaching me so much and feeding my enthusiasm about drum corps.

I don't have a baby so I tossed my cat across the room instead.

Haven't even begun to dig into this thread to find how others' viewed Finals, but as a highly vocal critic for many years of amplification and electronics, and particularly of "thunderous goo", i.e., bass synth (often at the expense of tubas), I wanted to note that thanks to a friend, I was able to buy great seats for Finals, and was delighted to find that the goo was almost never a problem. There was a little bit of goo in Boston's show, a bit more in Crossmen's, and almost no more to be heard during the evening. For instance, many people have been complaining all year about the Cadets' synth. At Finals, it wasn't a problem at all. I was astounded.

Now, I had had equally good seats at some local shows this season where the same corps did have goo problems, so I would like to encourage the corps to try to be as sensitive about this issue during the entire season as they apparently were on Saturday.

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Haven't even begun to dig into this thread to find how others' viewed Finals, but as a highly vocal critic for many years of amplification and electronics, and particularly of "thunderous goo", i.e., bass synth (often at the expense of tubas), I wanted to note that thanks to a friend, I was able to buy great seats for Finals, and was delighted to find that the goo was almost never a problem. There was a little bit of goo in Boston's show, a bit more in Crossmen's, and almost no more to be heard during the evening. For instance, many people have been complaining all year about the Cadets' synth. At Finals, it wasn't a problem at all. I was astounded.

Now, I had had equally good seats at some local shows this season where the same corps did have goo problems, so I would like to encourage the corps to try to be as sensitive about this issue during the entire season as they apparently were on Saturday.

The most interesting electronic questions is the ability of Bluecoats to seamlessly blend brass and electronics making it impossible to determine which was which. I was kind of shocked at semis at hearing what things sounded like without all the blend.

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It ought to, in my opinion. Obviously not much, but if you opt to start your show with timing that risks someone talking during your first hit, you're taking a small risk and you should be rewarded only if it works.

If you can hear him over the hit, hit harder

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I was kind of shocked at semis at hearing what things sounded like without all the blend.

Me too. Sounded almost like a different show.

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Haven't even begun to dig into this thread to find how others' viewed Finals, but as a highly vocal critic for many years of amplification and electronics, and particularly of "thunderous goo", i.e., bass synth (often at the expense of tubas), I wanted to note that thanks to a friend, I was able to buy great seats for Finals, and was delighted to find that the goo was almost never a problem. There was a little bit of goo in Boston's show, a bit more in Crossmen's, and almost no more to be heard during the evening. For instance, many people have been complaining all year about the Cadets' synth. At Finals, it wasn't a problem at all. I was astounded.

Now, I had had equally good seats at some local shows this season where the same corps did have goo problems, so I would like to encourage the corps to try to be as sensitive about this issue during the entire season as they apparently were on Saturday.

A lot more had more goo than BAC. I notice one spot to much sub woofer for about 5 seconds

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The most interesting electronic questions is the ability of Bluecoats to seamlessly blend brass and electronics making it impossible to determine which was which. I was kind of shocked at semis at hearing what things sounded like without all the blend.

First of all, congrats to the Bluecoats on the win. Any of the top three could have won and gotten little argument from me. The following observations are just that, observations.

I sat top row 141 nearest the 50 for prelims, then upstairs in 440 for semis, and finally row 8 of 140 near the 50 for finals. Lucas is an odd place, with only a small swath of the stadium offering what I would consider decent acoustics. Bluecoats did a few things that improved the volume and fidelity for a greater part of the crowd. Most groups used 2-5 speaker stations, usually in a "stereo" setup. As is typical in the activity, the focal point and source area of the sound revolves around the 50 yard line "front and center" area, and sound is/was directed toward the judges in a central area of the stands. As we all know, the "goo" factor is high at LOS. Sitting in the 400s, you hear the attacks and everything immediately dissolves into what I refer to as a "soup" that lingers and obliterates any clarity to the music.

Bloo carted 13 separate speaker stations onto the field, along with what had to be at least two dozen mic's. These were spread almost the entire width of the front sideline, as well as over the greater part of the field. This allowed them to bring a mixed/processed sound to a very wide focal area of the stadium, and also helped add a "3D" quality to the sound. Sadly, I didn't have a chance to hear Coats' horn line absent the speakers and processing, but as usual I'm sure they are/were a top drawer quality unit. From what I could hear, the percussion was probably the best line they've ever had. So from a music standpoint, they had it all "going on".

What really struck me, sitting in the low vantage at finals, was how much boost on the overall music sound (which was very good, don't get me wrong) they received from the speakers. I'd estimate conservatively that at least 50% above and beyond the acoustic contribution of the field brass and percussion. There were two points in their show where "the curtain" came down a bit, and the ensemble was playing without the backing of mic's or backing soloists. It was sort of jarring to hear the vast difference in volume, sound quality and simple impact. Well played for sure by the kids on the field, but wow. Such a difference.

Bloo was a clear winner of the "tech" category this season. I've seen this realm develop over the past few years, and Coats have been at the forefront of this movement. They're playing in a sandbox that nobody is in yet. At first, it was nice to have amplified pit instruments, subwoofers, then soloists, synthesizers and other acoustic instruments you'd never find on the field. Coats have jumped field electronics into the "sound design" era, in which you mic and process as much of the ensemble as possible. You design and deploy speakers to achieve effects and widen the focal point to include most, if not the entire crowd. This allows greater control over the ensemble sound, at the touch of a button or turn of a dial. It also opens up possibilities via ear monitors for the pit, processed/sampled/looped music, and much more. It's really a game changer, but I have to wonder if this is 1) where the activity should be headed, and 2) whether this "arms race" is going to prove to be so technical and expensive for many corps, that it ends up being a huge financial challenge.

I really struggle with those questions. The musician side of me digs the possibilities, the judge in me has to wonder if what I hear is really what I think I'm hearing, and the operations guy in me fears that the expense and technical know-how might be a bankrupting factor for some groups. I would hope (though I'm not holding my breath) that DCI will have the speaker/tech situation at the top of the agenda in their winter meetings. Hard decisions, both musical and financial, need to be made. I see too many corps struggling to keep their heads above water, dealing with rising travel costs and the ever-increasing cost of props, costuming, huge pit arrays and now this explosion of sound equipment. Are we returning to an era where only the best-off corps will be able to keep up with the competitive "needs" financially, while others struggle or die?

My feelings? No speakers on the field itself. Limits on the number that you can use. No in-ear monitors allowed. I'm all for creativity, but those without a budget (or at least the means to do anything they want) might drive those with limited resources off a cliff trying to keep up. Love to hear drums and bugles, but we're rapidly speeding toward a situation where what you hear scantly reflects what is on the field. I fear the death of things such as ensemble control, learning to listen and balance, dynamics and the natural resonance of brass and percussion instruments. It's much easier to turn a dial than to fix it "the old fashioned way", in many cases. The era of amplification, bass reinforcement, processed sound, sampling, and "designed sound" (requiring the employment of experts in the field) is in full force. Now it's up to DCI to rein things in a bit.

Edited by BDCorno
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The only "goo" I was able to discern during finals week was actually from the Cavies, but it kind of fit that section of the show so it wasn't bad.

Corps are definitely figuring out the best ways to tastefully use amplification and electronics, and I have a feeling that BDCorno is on the right track and this offseason there will be some discussion among the directors as to setting standards for their use.

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BRING IT DrumManTx! I can't think of a more qualified, non-judgmental, more sensitive, expressive and a more affirming DCP Member, who can so can write a Drum Corps, review in such uplifting words then you. (Yikes, talk about one heckll of a run-on sentence. lol)

I cannot wait to print your review out, as a keepsake summary of what has become of year of Milestones.....and gravestones, lol 2016, for me 2016 has been one of the most incredible and memorable seasons of DCI competition. (But then again, that can be said after most seasons,) Congratulations, Bravo particularly to Blooooo and The Academy on your year of many firsts. Matter of fact, whether your Corps performed 38th, Les Stentors (OH CANADA!, I'm French-Canadian, Salute) or First, Blooo!! Thanks to DCI LIVE, I watched, appreciated, and I celebrated, enjoyed, and embraced the incredible, effort, dedication and performances you put on the field this weekend in Indy. Godspeed to each and everyone of you. You Had A GREAT Show EVERYONE! Thank You.

Here ya go:

http://www.drumcorpsplanet.com/forums/index.php/topic/165064-final-thoughts-on-an-amazing-2016-season/

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