barigirl78

"Clash of the Corps" Episode Discussion

Recommended Posts

The clothing department didn't have any plumes so they found a feather duster in the janitors closet.

LOL!

Edited by Fish

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did Sarah Connor march with the Cadets?

Yes. She aged out.

Twice.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have some questions for the DCP braintrust. I prefer actual knowledge instead of speculation, of course:

Who instigated this project? One of the corps? DCI? Bob Jacobs? John DeNovi? Dave Gibbs? Hop?

Did the introduction begin with the film crew or directors, or do projects like these start with the producer, in this case The Rock?

How does the money or royalties break down? Do the corps benefit, does DCI (and therefore the other corps), or some combination?

Will there be a way for us in the activity to find out how well-received the show and series are?

What viewership would be considered a success for such a project? Drum corps is the small niche, but HS band is obviously huge; is the profit margin the only consideration? Or is profit a function of eyeballs and advertising?

Edited by garfield

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have some questions for the DCP braintrust. I prefer actual knowledge instead of speculation, of course:

Who instigated this project? One of the corps? DCI? Bob Jacobs? John DeNovi? Dave Gibbs? Hop?

Did the introduction begin with the film crew or directors, or do projects like these start with the producer, in this case The Rock?

How does the money or royalties break down? Do the corps benefit, does DCI (and therefore the other corps), or some combination?

Will there be a way for us in the activity to find out how well-received the show and series are?

What viewership would be considered a success for such a project? Drum corps is the small niche, but HS band is obviously huge; is the profit margin the only consideration? Or is profit a function of eyeballs and advertising?

I'd like to know this as well, and I would assume the answers will come out soon.

I will say, having attended probably the largest TOC show of 2016, there was absolutely nothing said about the show in Nashville. Nothing handed out to guests. No "booth" for Fuse that I saw. Really huge lost opportunity IMHO.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have some questions for the DCP braintrust. I prefer actual knowledge instead of speculation, of course:

Who instigated this project? One of the corps? DCI? Bob Jacobs? John DeNovi? Dave Gibbs? Hop?

Did the introduction begin with the film crew or directors, or do projects like these start with the producer, in this case The Rock?

How does the money or royalties break down? Do the corps benefit, does DCI (and therefore the other corps), or some combination?

Will there be a way for us in the activity to find out how well-received the show and series are?

What viewership would be considered a success for such a project? Drum corps is the small niche, but HS band is obviously huge; is the profit margin the only consideration? Or is profit a function of eyeballs and advertising?

I can't address the first three questions because I'm not close to the production.

As for the last two, I am quite familiar with the economics of TV.

Networks acquire show from producers for a license fee. In order to see the show as a success, they have to get more revenue from the show than the cost of the license fee. Cost is an important part of the equation.

Revenue is the other part.

Ads in the show are purchased based on the number of viewers a show generally gets. Younger viewers (Adults 18-49) are more valuable than older viewers. Nielsen is the measurement company for the ratings.

Besides the "cost vs. revenue" calculation, things like "critical acclaim" may come into play. Some lower rated shows don't get canceled for this.

The ratings of "Clash of the Corps" will be judged within the context of other shows on the network. The network is a very low-rated network. In a recent week, their highest rated show got a .05 rating. That's not a typo. It means .05% of Adults 18-49 watched. It's about 69 thousand people.

My assumption is that this show has to be one of their highest rated shows to be considered a success. They will also look to see if it is bringing new viewers to the network that they don't currently have...and how many.

Besides ratings, any way you view that can actually be measured by Fuse--VOD, watching on their website, or downloading their app and watching it--will also generate notice if it is a significant number of people.

Any illegal means that people watch does not count. If they can't earn revenue off of it, it doesn't exist to them. If an illegal version appears on YouTube and that's how you are watching it, it doesn't matter a bit to Fuse or the producers.

Edited by barigirl78
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't address the first three questions because I'm not close to the production.

As for the last two, I am quite familiar with the economics of TV.

Networks acquire show from producers for a license fee. In order to see the show as a success, they have to get more revenue from the show than the cost of the license fee. Cost is an important part of the equation.

Revenue is the other part.

Ads in the show are purchased based on the number of viewers a show generally gets. Younger viewers (Adults 18-49) are more valuable than older viewers. Nielsen is the measurement company for the ratings.

Besides the "cost vs. revenue" calculation, things like "critical acclaim" may come into play. Some lower rated shows don't get canceled for this.

The ratings of "Clash of the Corps" will be judged within the context of other shows on the network. The network is a very low-rated network. In a recent week, their highest rated show got a .05 rating. That's not a typo. It means .05% of Adults 18-49 watched. It's about 69 thousand people.

My assumption is that this show has to be one of their highest rated shows to be considered a success. They will also look to see if it is bringing new viewers to the network that they don't currently have...and how many.

Besides ratings, any way you view that can actually be measured by Fuse--VOD, watching on their website, or downloading their app and watching it--will also generate notice if it is a significant number of people.

Any illegal means that people watch does not count. If they can't earn revenue off of it, it doesn't exist to them. If an illegal version appears on YouTube and that's how you are watching it, it doesn't matter a bit to Fuse or the producers.

Excellent explanation. Thanks.

I understand from Johnson's FB page that tomorrow (Tuesday) he's going to have a free streaming of the show on his FB page. Will that count as viewership even though it's not on the FUSE page?

And I wonder about the rest of the series. If the first show is not watched widely, is there a risk that the other 7 shows in the series could be cancelled?

Based on your explanation, if it's widely viewed and measured as a success, it's feasible that Johnson could attempt to sell it to a different network next year? Perhaps something more widely watched?

Thanks a bunch. It's obvious that drum corps fans have the opportunity to make up for the follies that got drum corps cancelled from PBS by promoting and watching the series over the next 8 weeks. I know my family is promoting the crap out of it (kids in school and all of us on FB) and I hope other fans are doing so as well.

This is an admittedly small trampoline, but it might be just the jump-start that DC could use to someday compete with Punkin' Chunkin' or the cheerleading championships.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent explanation. Thanks.

I understand from Johnson's FB page that tomorrow (Tuesday) he's going to have a free streaming of the show on his FB page. Will that count as viewership even though it's not on the FUSE page?

And I wonder about the rest of the series. If the first show is not watched widely, is there a risk that the other 7 shows in the series could be cancelled?

Based on your explanation, if it's widely viewed and measured as a success, it's feasible that Johnson could attempt to sell it to a different network next year? Perhaps something more widely watched?

Thanks a bunch. It's obvious that drum corps fans have the opportunity to make up for the follies that got drum corps cancelled from PBS by promoting and watching the series over the next 8 weeks. I know my family is promoting the crap out of it (kids in school and all of us on FB) and I hope other fans are doing so as well.

This is an admittedly small trampoline, but it might be just the jump-start that DC could use to someday compete with Punkin' Chunkin' or the cheerleading championships.

Imagine if the do a sequel or a season two :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to know this as well, and I would assume the answers will come out soon.

I will say, having attended probably the largest TOC show of 2016, there was absolutely nothing said about the show in Nashville. Nothing handed out to guests. No "booth" for Fuse that I saw. Really huge lost opportunity IMHO.

Nothing whatsoever at Dekalb either. Was there a booth or anything at championships? I didn't see one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have some questions for the DCP braintrust. I prefer actual knowledge instead of speculation, of course:

Who instigated this project? One of the corps? DCI? Bob Jacobs? John DeNovi? Dave Gibbs? Hop?

Did the introduction begin with the film crew or directors, or do projects like these start with the producer, in this case The Rock?

How does the money or royalties break down? Do the corps benefit, does DCI (and therefore the other corps), or some combination?

Will there be a way for us in the activity to find out how well-received the show and series are?

What viewership would be considered a success for such a project? Drum corps is the small niche, but HS band is obviously huge; is the profit margin the only consideration? Or is profit a function of eyeballs and advertising?

AFAIK the producers of the shows approached corps until they found two who were willing to do it. DCI didn't create this concept. There is money in it for the participating corps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.