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In The News – Drum Corps Chairman Resigns Amid Scrutiny Of His Hiring Of Disgraced Teacher

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4 hours ago, Jeff Ream said:

in the real business world, if the issue the boss refuses to discuss is serious enough, you often have an HR department you can take your concerns to. In this drum corps, you had the director and his wife, who were also two of the board members.

 

There was no backup plan or contingency. it was in essence a dictatorship. And who'd have thought when YEA sold Crossmen, some of the management practices would be the same, regardless of the names changing

In many businesses the CEO gets to make these calls regarding all sorts of decisions (as long as they are not braking the law). How many stories have we read in the last 6 months where the HR department was an extension of the C suite and was there to PROTECT the C suite execs... not the employees (Fox News, NBC, Weinstein Company, etc). I knew one CEO of a large music manufacturer who once said "My employees vote on my decisions every two weeks. That is when the sign the back of their pay checks. If they do not like the decisions they do not have to sign their check." That's pretty dictatorial and is more common than not. 

Curious... where do you see similarities in management practices between Old YEA and Xmen? 

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7 minutes ago, MusicManNJ said:

In many businesses the CEO gets to make these calls regarding all sorts of decisions (as long as they are not braking the law). How many stories have we read in the last 6 months where the HR department was an extension of the C suite and was there to PROTECT the C suite execs... not the employees (Fox News, NBC, Weinstein Company, etc). I knew one CEO of a large music manufacturer who once said "My employees vote on my decisions every two weeks. That is when the sign the back of their pay checks. If they do not like the decisions they do not have to sign their check." That's pretty dictatorial and is more common than not. 

Curious... where do you see similarities in management practices between Old YEA and Xmen? 

similarities? the buck stopping with the director and the board rubber stamping things

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2 minutes ago, Jeff Ream said:

similarities? the buck stopping with the director and the board rubber stamping things

My guess is this is more the rule than the exception in DCI. Same could be said for many small to mid-size (revenue < $5 million). YEA was one of the greatest failures of governance in the history of non profits (in my opinion... and I have spent years working on non profit, for profit and public company governance). 

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25 minutes ago, MusicManNJ said:

My guess is this is more the rule than the exception in DCI. Same could be said for many small to mid-size (revenue < $5 million). YEA was one of the greatest failures of governance in the history of non profits (in my opinion... and I have spent years working on non profit, for profit and public company governance). 

well biggest that we know of. Doesn't make it right. This is the biggest wake up call DCi could ever receive, and it seems like, well....lessons not being learned

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20 minutes ago, Jeff Ream said:

well biggest that we know of. Doesn't make it right. This is the biggest wake up call DCi could ever receive, and it seems like, well....lessons not being learned

Not suggesting that it makes it right... if anything, to your point, this should be a big wake up call. The actions of one can effect the many and poor governance can wreak havoc across the activity. As the old saying goes...you are only as strong as your weakest link... and most governance links in the DCI chain probably follow a similar models as YEA/Xmen (strong CEO/Weak Board).

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2 hours ago, Various said:

Interesting.  Even more interesting is that the "concerned" people didn't take it further when they were refused intercession.  What stopped them?

 

Carol

Good question, Carol.  And it's good to see you on here!!!  I hope all is well with you!!!

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1 hour ago, Jeff Ream said:

well biggest that we know of. Doesn't make it right. This is the biggest wake up call DCi could ever receive, and it seems like, well....lessons not being learned

  DCI began in 1972.

 The Philadelphia Inquirer started their newspaper in 1829.

  DCI will dramatically change its ways regarding hiring/ retaining high risk people that schools have deemed unfit to be in schools.

  Or DCI will fold and cease to exist, imo

  The outfit I listed above on here that began their operations in 1829  ? They're not going away any time soon.

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22 minutes ago, BRASSO said:

  DCI began in 1972.

 The Philadelphia Inquirer started their newspaper in 1829.

  DCI will dramatically change its ways regarding hiring/ retaining high risk people that schools have deemed unfit to be in schools.

  Or DCI will fold and cease to exist, imo

  The outfit I listed above on here that began their operations in 1829  ? They're not going away any time soon.

That is the same year the Yuengling family began brewing beer in Pottsville, PA.  Hopefully, they're not going away anytime soon either.  :tongue:

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3 hours ago, BRASSO said:

  DCI began in 1972.

 The Philadelphia Inquirer started their newspaper in 1829.

  DCI will dramatically change its ways regarding hiring/ retaining high risk people that schools have deemed unfit to be in schools.

  Or DCI will fold and cease to exist, imo

  The outfit I listed above on here that began their operations in 1829  ? They're not going away any time soon.

it's more than the age of the institutions. and trust me, the Inquirer has had some rocky ( no pun intended) times. 

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