The Beanpot, Lynn, MA July 2, 2018


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Very proud - they are hanging in there with the heat. And amused by all the folks going ga-ga over their relative standing so far. Certainly pumped that they're doing better than last year, and enjoyi

For as progressive as Boston is with some elements of their show (costuming, props, etc), they had probably the most straight-forward raw drum corps show of the night. Insane drill, challenging music,

Prior to BAC's show, lots of folks chanted  "Eat em up Boston." Well I would say they didn't eat, the DEVOURED!!!! Amazing show!

1 minute ago, GUARDLING said:

 YES, and if everything was about standing Os then they wouldn't mean anything would it. Usually, even with conventional drill is the build-up to that moment which makes people stand.

Absolutely! Some of the most impactful moments in DCI history (off the top of my head, SCV 1989 Music of the Night climax) were impactful because they were developed musically, visually, drill-wise, to make that arrival that much more satisfying. If done right, and there are many modern examples of it, scatter drill can play a part in creating such moments. 

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There are many examples of it working very well, particularly in the 80s (Cadets 85-90, SCV and others).  It was used sparingly and with variety.  I'm not against scatter drill. 

Today, it's the go-to transition and I find it terribly uninteresting and unworthy of high visual marks.  Intricate, readable forms, with innovative transitions and obvious precision in execution are my preference.  

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18 minutes ago, GUARDLING said:

Has nothing to do with reward nor does the conventional drill. It has alluded that scatter drills were cheating of some sort or easier to do, which it is not. Again, a misconception is that the scatter or random movement wasn't planned out, maybe with some but those who do it successfully, simply not true.

You were certainly implying that "difficult to teach" is somehow a redeeming quality to scatter drill.  

The term "planned" is a very vague word.   You may have end-points in mind but not know exactly how you're going to get from here to there until you put it on the field.    A lot of the random movement being taught today (even at the highest level)  is being taught "organically" (as if on a winterguard floor).  While there can be certain advantages to working this way , the same effect can be completely achieved via Pyware and conventional drill IF the designer has sufficient imagination to do so. 

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13 minutes ago, Ediker said:

There are many examples of it working very well, particularly in the 80s (Cadets 85-90, SCV and others).  It was used sparingly and with variety.  I'm not against scatter drill. 

Today, it's the go-to transition and I find it terribly uninteresting and unworthy of high visual marks.  Intricate, readable forms, with innovative transitions and obvious precision in execution are my preference.  

You’re certainly entitled to your opinion of your personal enjoyment of the use of scatter drill. With the high use of scatter drill in today’s DCI and the rewarding of it through scoring, the judges clearly disagree. 

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Just now, mort2885 said:

You’re certainly entitled to your opinion of your personal enjoyment of the use of scatter drill. With the high use of scatter drill in today’s DCI and the rewarding of it through scoring, the judges clearly disagree. 

Agreed, and I'm not alone.  

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25 minutes ago, karuna said:

You were certainly implying that "difficult to teach" is somehow a redeeming quality to scatter drill.  

The term "planned" is a very vague word.   You may have end-points in mind but not know exactly how you're going to get from here to there until you put it on the field.    A lot of the random movement being taught today (even at the highest level)  is being taught "organically" (as if on a winterguard floor).  While there can be certain advantages to working this way , the same effect can be completely achieved via Pyware and conventional drill IF the designer has sufficient imagination to do so. 

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I am very well aware ,teaching in WGI as well as DCI how this is done and the difficulty of it. You are correct on start and end points, which actually is my point of difficulty with all the in between and making that right.. As far as difficult to teach, it doesn't matter how hard or easy it is to do all that matters is has it reached the effect

It's kind of like when a guard throws 7s people think WOW they should have scored higher, so what! everyone throws them, was it creative getting in and out? did they multilayer body to work? did they execute? do they just toss for the sake of tossing/ Often its not just about the actual effect but the before after and was it not only done right but was it appropriate to many factors including music and others on the field.

I think as far as a preference that can be something different, Just a matter of taste. It doesn't negate or cancel out  the difficulty of either nor the worth of either

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1 minute ago, Ediker said:

Agreed, and I'm not alone.  

I’m sure you aren’t. Personally, I think it is used much more effectively now than when I aged out in 2007, and I’m all about effects being used as effectively as possible. As far as the concept itself, I’m pretty neutral. Good is good. 

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2 minutes ago, GUARDLING said:

I am very well aware ,teaching in WGI as well as DCI how this is done and the difficulty of it. You are correct on start and end points, which actually is my point of difficulty with all the in between and making that right.. As far as difficult to teach, it doesn't matter how hard or easy it is to do all that matters is has it reached the effect

Actually it DOES matter!  Things that are easier to teach are more efficient.  Efficiency is major factor in getting clean.  Time is a fixed quantity.  You cannot buy more (well you can do fewer shows so in a sense that's "buying" time.  And who historically does fewer shows every year? ).  

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1 minute ago, karuna said:

Actually it DOES matter!  Things that are easier to teach are more efficient.  Efficiency is major factor in getting clean.  Time is a fixed quantity.  You cannot buy more (well you can do fewer shows so in a sense that's "buying" time.  And who historically does fewer shows every year? ).  

Now this also would have to do with who one is teaching and planning...what I meant was it does not matter to a judge , which it doesn't

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