Tim K

The Beanpot, Lynn, MA July 2, 2018

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6 hours ago, cixelsyd said:

But in scatter, it is not necessary for every pathway to be exactly the same in each performance.

OH yes, it does otherwise there can be crash and burn. Change one thing and it all comes apart. This is what people do not get how hard it actually is. Scatter or random movement is far from random.

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6 hours ago, cixelsyd said:

 scatter is much more fault tolerant.  Both form and technique can be abandoned in the transition.  Marching in formation requires more simultaneous skills to be perfected

 True, imo.

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6 hours ago, cixelsyd said:

But in scatter, it is not necessary for every pathway to be exactly the same in each performance.

You seem to be implying that every corps learns drill via dot books. That is not correct. The placement of forms is not necessarily identical show to show. 

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22 minutes ago, Cappybara said:

You seem to be implying that every corps learns drill via dot books.  

 Thats not my interpretation from his remarks though at all. But perhaps he can tell us.

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8 hours ago, GUARDLING said:

OH yes, it does otherwise there can be crash and burn. Change one thing and it all comes apart. This is what people do not get how hard it actually is. Scatter or random movement is far from random.

I know it is not random, but that does not make it equally difficult compared to conventional marching.

For example, if I am one of 80 horn players in a conventional drill move, and I take a path that veers 10 inches off intended course, I will commit a clear interval error.  If my step size takes me 10 inches ahead/behind, I will clearly be out of the form.

In a scatter move, neither of those errors detracts from the adjudicated quality or effect of the move as long as I arrive at my proper destination on time.  I can veer 10 inches off course with impunity, as long as I do not collide with someone else.  In fact, I could even collide with someone, and pretend we did it on purpose, and as long as we both recover in time, no harm done.  I could stop someone, shake their hand and have a conversation, as long as we both get where we are going on time.

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42 minutes ago, cixelsyd said:

  I could stop someone, shake their hand and have a conversation, as long as we both get where we are going on time.

Shaking hands is so old school.  High fives are a better visual as two mm scatter drill past each other.  Some corps are considering using fist pumps to get some feed back from the judges.  Rumor has it M. Gaines has been working up a show theme where the mm spend most of the show marching/scatter drilling backwards.

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2 hours ago, Ghost said:

Shaking hands is so old school.  High fives are a better visual as two mm scatter drill past each other.  Some corps are considering using fist pumps to get some feed back from the judges.  Rumor has it M. Gaines has been working up a show theme where the mm spend most of the show marching/scatter drilling backwards.

 

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5 hours ago, cixelsyd said:

I know it is not random, but that does not make it equally difficult compared to conventional marching.

For example, if I am one of 80 horn players in a conventional drill move, and I take a path that veers 10 inches off intended course, I will commit a clear interval error.  If my step size takes me 10 inches ahead/behind, I will clearly be out of the form.

In a scatter move, neither of those errors detracts from the adjudicated quality or effect of the move as long as I arrive at my proper destination on time.  I can veer 10 inches off course with impunity, as long as I do not collide with someone else.  In fact, I could even collide with someone, and pretend we did it on purpose, and as long as we both recover in time, no harm was done.  I could stop someone, shake their hand and have a conversation, as long as we both get where we are going on time.

1

Which is exactly why it is easier to clean. Now with that said, you are also looking at basic and obvious " Drill " move mistakes, there is much more to be judged and can be. 

As to you 2nd statement, Again that is the furthest thing from the truth. Pathways MUST be the same every time, sure there are spacing issues, although that can be an issue of clutter and crash and burn because others around you are not aware something has changed. With forms, one can always at least follow a form, With no form others around you, can be clueless as to what happens next if someone changes it. When you as " as long as I do not collide", that again you prove my point that there is much more to it than you give it credit for. Those who teach and think as long as you do not collide are not successful at doing this.

Clearly, I won't be able to convince you of these facts based on personal experience in every form and every level including judging of late nor am I trying to. I am just adding my 2 cents and perspective on my actual experience.Thanks for the conversation.:smile:

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