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13 hours ago, Huntington Mallets said:

1972 Kingsmen

1983 Cadets

1993 Star

2005 Cadets

2013 Crown

2018 SCV

That's a pretty good list right there.

Mike

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14 hours ago, boxingfred said:

1972 Kingsmen - Start

1976- Blue Devils- Changed how drum corps sound based on instrumentation and composition

1980 -  Brought Broadway to drum corps and dance to Colorguard not to mention the best percussion lines of the early 80's 

1983- Garfield Cadets - The Cadets bought asymmetrical  drill design to a championship corps

1991- Academie Musicale- Bought body movement to drum corps in a major way.

1993- Star Of Indiana- Bought body movement to world-class corps  in a major way

2006- Cadets-  Presented a show with a singer, characters in costumes Large props, an acrobatic color guard,  people jumping off pink benches, Uniform/costumes on the corps proper, body movement etc... This show was a case of too much too soon and was blasted by critics

*Forgot to add Amplification innovators- Cadets did introduce amplification to modern drum corps ( via rules congress )but Bluecoats perfected it.  So.

2014 Bluecoats or 2015 Bluecoats-  

2018- Santa Clara Vanguard-Finish

Honorable Mention- 1976 Bridgemen,  2004 Carolina Crown,  So many others

* There are so many corps I could have added. I'll make a second list after I see a few other lists.  I have a second and third list ready to go. 

*Don't criticize my list unless you put together one of your own.

He said 6.  I'm sorry sir but you are disqualified. (Said in jest. Good list)

Edited by HockeyDad

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1975 Blue Devils - 76 BD was 75 refined. 75 was the true innovation. An entirely new musical sound introduced to the activity. 

1980 SCV. Dissolved the 50 yard line and it never returned. The end of symmetric drill. 

1980 27th Lancers (1980 was a big year). Zingali showed how color guard could drive a show. 

1993 Star of Indiana. For the body movement introduction. 

2000 Cavaliers. Showed that visual can drive a show. Melody now optional. 

2016 BC. Introduced the "z" dimension, adding a third dimension to a show. Also for introducing the no-uniform look that caught on with amazing speed. 

Those are six shows that come to my mind that got us from Kingsmen to SCV (2018 version)

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47 minutes ago, HockeyDad said:

1975 Blue Devils - 76 BD was 75 refined. 75 was the true innovation. An entirely new musical sound introduced to the activity. 

1980 SCV. Dissolved the 50 yard line and it never returned. The end of symmetric drill. 

1980 27th Lancers (1980 was a big year). Zingali showed how color guard could drive a show. 

1993 Star of Indiana. For the body movement introduction. 

2000 Cavaliers. Showed that visual can drive a show. Melody now optional. 

2016 BC. Introduced the "z" dimension, adding a third dimension to a show. Also for introducing the no-uniform look that caught on with amazing speed. 

Those are six shows that come to my mind that got us from Kingsmen to SCV (2018 version)

That's a great list. As much as I love what Cadets did to change things in 1983, SCV started it as you said in 1980.

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 Also, the  Drum & Bugle Corps genre evolution did not magically somehow begin in 1972 with the formation of DCI.  There were LOTS of benchmark years with Corps that did lots of things that were " a first ". The early 30's Drum Corps had only " sopranos ". The later 30's introduced the " baritone ", one octave lower than the " soprano " musical range.  For example, the " first " Drum Corps to utilize a contra bass ( tuba ), on the shoulder, musical instrument, was a Canadian Drum Corps I believe on or around 1958-1960 or so. ( Toronto Optimists ? ). The contra bass allowed 2 octave playing below that of the " soprano ". in the mid 60's, the mellophone was added. Prior to the 50's, 60's, Bugles went from valveless to horizontal slides, to piston rotors. It wasn't until the early 60's that the rull chromatic scale could even be played. In 1967, the American Legion Rules Congress approved for the 1st time the legalization of the G-F- F#  piston-rotor Bugles in competition. Later in 1977, DCI legalized the two valve vertical piston instrument, and then the 3 valved instruments in 1987. And of course, the Bb's later replaced the " G"'s principal key range in the early 90's, to become more uniform with the conventional MB brass instruments. I believe it was the Santa Clara Vanguard that first utilized the piccolo bugle.. ( pitched an octave above the soprano ) in the early 70's or so.

 And we have not even touched upon the evolutionary developments of the Percussion, nor the Color Guard side of Drum & Bugle Corps that predates the formation of DCI in 1972. Nor the Corps from these era's that molded the activity from the end of WW2 to 1972. There is compelling persuasive evidence that the Drum & Bugle Corps genre was actually molded more substantially and more transformationally in the 1945 to 1970 era than from 1972 to 1997, or from 1998 to today's era. In the late 40's for example, Corps were judged primarily in field competition doing a circular parade formation drill routine around the football field..  A mere decade later however , Corps were being judged in off the line visual drill maneuvers, concert formations entrance and exit drills, Color Guard formation drills and so forth.., completely transformational and with far more drill complexity from what was being judged in Drum Corps " M& M " ( Marching and Maneuvering ) drill just a decade earlier.

Edited by BRASSO

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72 Kingsmen

 

76 BD

 

82 Cadets

 

93 Star

 

2000 Cavies

 

2008 Phantom

 

2014 Bloo

 

2017 Vanguard

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What an interesting topic to lose my DCP virginity on, so I'll offer a top 4.  

Having been basically away from the activity from the 1990s - early 2000's and return as a fan I missed a ton, but...

1. 1976 Blue Devils - not only a refinement of '75, but some very new innovations in all areas.

2. Also have to include 1976 Bridgemen. Who knew drum corps didn't have to be VFW /American Legion rigid and stiff any longer? They did.

3. 1980 27th Lancers for reasons mentioned above.

4. 2018 SCV - like other old timers it took me a few years of the 2000's to adjust to all of the changes in drum corps, but my God, in all my life, the most talented, innovative and creative force in drum corps I have ever witnessed. I was stunned , even after those few years of adjusting.

 

Edited by OldSnareDrummer
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27 minutes ago, BRASSO said:

 Also, the  Drum & Bugle Corps genre evolution did not magically somehow begin in 1972 with the formation of DCI.  There were LOTS of benchmark years with Corps that did lots of things that were " a first ". The early 30's Drum Corps had only " sopranos ". The later 30's introduced the " baritone ", one octave lower than the " soprano " musical range.  For example, the " first " Drum Corps to utilize a contra bass ( tuba ), on the shoulder, musical instrument, was a Canadian Drum Corps I believe on or around 1958-1960 or so. ( Toronto Optimists ? ). The contra bass allowed 2 octave playing below that of the " soprano ". in the mid 60's, the mellophone was added. Prior to the 50's, 60's, Bugles went from valveless to horizontal slides, to piston rotors. It wasn't until the early 60's that the rull chromatic scale could even be played. In 1967, the American Legion Rules Congress approved for the 1st time the legalization of the G-F- F#  piston-rotor Bugles in competition. Later in 1977, DCI legalized the two valve vertical piston instrument, and then the 3 valved instruments in 1987. And of course, the Bb's later replaced the " G"'s principal key range in the early 90's, to become more uniform with the conventional MB brass instruments. I believe it was the Santa Clara Vanguard that first utilized the piccolo bugle.. ( pitched an octave above the soprano ) in the early 70's or so.

 And we have not even touched upon the evolutionary developments of the Percussion, nor the Color Guard side of Drum & Bugle Corps that predates the formation of DCI in 1972. Nor the Corps from these era's that molded the activity from the end of WW2 to 1972. There is compelling persuasive evidence that the Drum & Bugle Corps genre was actually molded more substantially and more transformationally in the 1945 to 1970 era than from 1972 to 1997, or from 1998 to today's era. In the late 40's for example, Corps were judged primarily in field competition doing a circular parade formation drill routine around the football field..  A mere decade later however , Corps were being judged in off the line visual drill maneuvers, concert formations entrance and exit drills, Color Guard formation drills and so forth.., completely transformational from what was being judged in Drum Corps " M& M " ( Marching and Maneuvering ) drill just a decade earlier.

Yeah but, we're trying to answer per his request, which was how did we get from 72 to 18.  Not an indictment of anything that came before. 

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3 minutes ago, HockeyDad said:

Yeah but, we're trying to answer per his request, which was how did we get from 72 to 18.  Not an indictment of anything that came before. 

 good point.

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Kevin Bacon.

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