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cybersnyder

What would today's shows score if teleported back to 1989?

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Excuse me ☝️ I don’t get why any of this matters. 

Edited by Poppycock
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The fact is  Bb/F instrumentation (much less a 3rd valve) was not allowed as well as everything else stated.  Also there was a 128 member limit AND regardless of losing they would have to stick around for retreat! :)  The penalties for being off field would be huge as well.

Now a corps then competing today?  It would depend if they got credit for difficulty for playing while moving and the horns they played on.  Corps back in 89 played/marched a lot more.  It would depend on what current judging is pushing vs what is on the field.  I don't know, but what is interesting is that a corps from back then could compete in todays rules without being disqualified.

It would be interesting to hear the differences side/side.  It would explain why corps wanted to amplify the pit.

**Note I forgot to add overage members in 89

 

Edited by Mello Dude

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8 hours ago, Box5Opinion said:

Why are you doing this? 2019 shows would of been laughed at in 1989. Different score sheets, different style of design, etc...... A better question would be what shows would be able to compete in this day of age with the current scoring system? 

He seems to be doing it in search of some positive reinforcement that today’s shows are super awesome and better than anything in the past.  You can’t compare shows of different eras developed under very different judging criteria. You just can’t. And also, you will never get people to agree. So, yeah....what is the point?

Edited by HockeyDad
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Now from PURE GE I would love to see what Madison 95 would do today in scoring.....

 

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6 minutes ago, Mello Dude said:

Now from PURE GE I would love to see what Madison 95 would do today in scoring.....

I feel there’s more GE today with more mm, larger guards, props, etc.  Crowds going bonkers do not add to a corps GE.

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I will remain a prisoner of the moment, when it comes to '89. SCV & PR were epic that season, and for me will remain so in perpetuity.

If I'm a Luddite or dinosaur, so be it.. 

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12 hours ago, mfrontz said:

I'm am old timer. I marched only a few years after 89.

The tick system was out in 84. Even if it weren't, I don't think the corps of today would ever score 50.

If you examine the music, drill, work of today and directly compare it to then, you'd find that corps today are performing the same vocabulary at a higher frequency than then (meaning that big 'wow' drill moments and whiplash musical passages of that time are 'small potatoes' for the 15th place corps of today and performed with the same proficiency).

The issue would be in General Effect ratings.  I argue that shows today very closely mirror the staged theatrics of that era (Phantom, Vanguard, Star, etc.).

I think these shows today would win huge (assuming that all of the rule allowances of today applied).

Edited by cfirwin3

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10 hours ago, N.E. Brigand said:

 

Edited to note comparative times:

Bluecoats 1989:

Total show length 10 min. 50 sec.

How long any part of the brass plays while moving: 6 min. 1 sec.

Bluecoats 2019:

Total show length: 12 min. 13 sec.

How long any part of the brass plays while moving: 2 min. 27 sec.

I never understood the assertion being made in these types of (highly subjective) observations.

For example: Blue Devils 1992 (close to that era) played a closer that defined drumcorps for a couple generations.  But look at that absolutely wonderful and cherished moment:

They are 'moving' essentially the whole time while playing (some groups stop occasionally in the dice or in form, but there is motion constantly).  However... they are BARELY moving.  They are marching the drill style of the time, but that is essentially just a handful of set points with nothing pushing higher than an 8to5 step interval at a moderate rock tempo (sometimes in double time for some groups).  They are also playing out pretty full the entire time... but as with the drill, they are playing very accessible music all the while.

It's iconic, none the less.  It packs heavy GE, none the less.  But these 'stopwatch' comparisons seem to completely miss the forest from the trees nearly every time they are made (on the grounds that they lack context apart from considering timing of any motion vs. the application of any air to horns).

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2 hours ago, cfirwin3 said:

I never understood the assertion being made in these types of (highly subjective) observations.

For example: Blue Devils 1992 (close to that era) played a closer that defined drumcorps for a couple generations.  But look at that absolutely wonderful and cherished moment:

They are 'moving' essentially the whole time while playing (some groups stop occasionally in the dice or in form, but there is motion constantly).  However... they are BARELY moving.  They are marching the drill style of the time, but that is essentially just a handful of set points with nothing pushing higher than an 8to5 step interval at a moderate rock tempo (sometimes in double time for some groups).  They are also playing out pretty full the entire time... but as with the drill, they are playing very accessible music all the while.

It's iconic, none the less.  It packs heavy GE, none the less.  But these 'stopwatch' comparisons seem to completely miss the forest from the trees nearly every time they are made (on the grounds that they lack context apart from considering timing of any motion vs. the application of any air to horns).

I agree that the stopwatch comparisons are silly. But couldn't disagree more about the 1992 BD closer....The crowd reacts to the music, but from a visual design standpoint, it's pretty boring and underdeveloped.

 

 

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I think it IS undeniable that both eras represented the absolute best of the best of marching music. If you are new to this activity or young enough not to know the 80s and 90s, a better comparison would be this:  Look at what the top High School bands we’re doing and compare it to what the top DCI were doing. The top DCI corps were then, and are now, elite. 

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