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Bucbari

A touch of history me thinks

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Avedis Zildjian lived in Constantinople during the 17th century and practiced alchemy, the study of transforming metals into gold. In a stroke of luck in 1618, he accidentally discovered a unique metal alloy made from tin, silver, and copper. Avedis used this new alloy to make cymbals, and was amazed at the powerful sound that was created as a result. Word of his marvelous new cymbals spread, and the sultan requested that he make more for his elite band. As he perfected his craft, Avedis was given the honorary title of "Zildjian," which means "son of a cymbal maker." 

For the next four centuries, Avedis’s cymbal making process remained a family secret and the Zildjian business grew. Eventually, the company moved to the United States, and today, Zildjian cymbals remain popular with musicians.

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Interesting story. I'd never really looked at Zildjan's site before. The price of cymbals (and every other musical instrument I suppose)...aiye carumba. 

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On 10/30/2019 at 5:53 PM, Bucbari said:

Avedis Zildjian lived in Constantinople during the 17th century and practiced alchemy, the study of transforming metals into gold. In a stroke of luck in 1618, he accidentally discovered a unique metal alloy made from tin, silver, and copper. Avedis used this new alloy to make cymbals, and was amazed at the powerful sound that was created as a result. Word of his marvelous new cymbals spread, and the sultan requested that he make more for his elite band. As he perfected his craft, Avedis was given the honorary title of "Zildjian," which means "son of a cymbal maker." 

For the next four centuries, Avedis’s cymbal making process remained a family secret and the Zildjian business grew. Eventually, the company moved to the United States, and today, Zildjian cymbals remain popular with musicians.

Technically "zildjian" means son of a metal maker. And the sultan's elite bands were known as the janissaries. 

 

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" And the sultan's elite bands were known as the janissaries.  "

And, as the story goes, one of these bands was sent by the Turks as a gift to Napoleon, who loved pageantry, and thus began the tradition of military marching bands in Europe, and eventually in the good ol' US of A.

Mark time, hut!

 

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On 10/31/2019 at 11:34 PM, ironlips said:

" And the sultan's elite bands were known as the janissaries.  "

And, as the story goes, one of these bands was sent by the Turks as a gift to Napoleon, who loved pageantry, and thus began the tradition of military marching bands in Europe, and eventually in the good ol' US of A.

Mark time, hut!

 

So... would it be too much of a stretch to blame the Turks and Napoleon for amplification/electronics? :tongue:

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7 hours ago, Fran Haring said:

So... would it be too much of a stretch to blame the Turks and Napoleon for amplification/electronics? :tongue:

Well, I'm fairly certain Napoleon would have used a microphone if he had had one. He evidently enjoyed public speaking.

Seriously though, "marching music" was pretty much a utilitarian thing for moving troops around until the Little Corporal got a look at those Janissary bands the Turks had, with their enormous busby shakos, colorful uniforms and drum majors carrying maces with bells and cymbals mounted, the aptly-named "Jingling Johnnies".

You could draw a pretty straight line from those things to the 27th Lancers, Schaumburg Guardsmen and the Hoffman-era Bridgemen.

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On 11/4/2019 at 11:53 PM, ironlips said:

Well, I'm fairly certain Napoleon would have used a microphone if he had had one. He evidently enjoyed public speaking.

Seriously though, "marching music" was pretty much a utilitarian thing for moving troops around until the Little Corporal got a look at those Janissary bands the Turks had, with their enormous busby shakos, colorful uniforms and drum majors carrying maces with bells and cymbals mounted, the aptly-named "Jingling Johnnies".

You could draw a pretty straight line from those things to the 27th Lancers, Schaumburg Guardsmen and the Hoffman-era Bridgemen.

The use of metallic percussion instruments was greatly increased in Europe due to the reach of the Ottoman empire. 

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