wolfgang

(Percussion) Some corps should recruit these kids for their line

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I can't believe how good these high school lines have gotten.  These guys are just super impressive.  I feel like I'm watching a drum corps, but it's just a high school band.  I'm kinda blown away by this.

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15 hours ago, cybersnyder said:

I’ve never noticed different tenors in a drum line. I like. 

The ones in the back are commonly called "flubs". Usually flub players are younger members who don't have the chops yet to make the snare or tenor line and they play a less technical part that's more focused on impacts.

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Saw them six times live over the season, they’re incredible.   What I love about Vandegrift’s percussion is their touch and musicality is second to none IMO in the H.S. world in a marching band setting.  They know when to lead and be the dominant force and when to support and play with incredible subtlety.  Their stuff in the ballad isn’t the hardest in the show, but the way they perform it......whew.  

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On 11/19/2019 at 11:01 AM, gak27 said:

 

In 1980, SCV used 4 high and 4 low voice tenors:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yoNuwITZ-IY

I remember watching SCV and North Star practice in the lot in Birmingham. Incredible!

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Standard Practice for Chino Hills High School  to have Flubs

1993 Blue Knights Went High-Low like SCV, of course former SCV Perc Cap Head Ralph Hardimon was the Cap Head for BK 1991-2000?

 

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On 11/18/2019 at 6:56 PM, wolfgang said:

If you have about 10 minutes and aren't familiar with what high school lines can do, check this out. The new BOA Grand National Champion final run through with a camera following the drum line around.  

Vandegrift drumline @ final rehearsal

I realize comparing outdoor and indoor is a little bit apples and oranges, but for percussionists, how does this line compare to someone like Chino Hills?  I wonder how many alumni of this 10-year old program have marched corps, and if any of these young men and women plan to march in DCI once their high school days end.

I would say not at the level of Chino Hills, and yes they also march in the fall. Vandegrift no questions is clean and musical. I love their execution of isolated rolls and attacks. In regards the notes and difficulty, not at the level (imho) of the lines in SoCal like Ayala, Chino Hills, Arcadia etc

 

CHINO HILLS 2018 last Fall


 

Edited by Jeffe77

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On 11/19/2019 at 10:38 PM, Beckham said:

The ones in the back are commonly called "flubs". Usually flub players are younger members who don't have the chops yet to make the snare or tenor line and they play a less technical part that's more focused on impacts.

I was going to say. Flubs have been around for a fairly good amount of time and they CAN add some interesting voicing potentially. Not that they DO.....but they CAN. High school lines have been getting better and better for decades. We can complain all we want about the internet, but it definitely has helped on the instruction end. If I can slow down and rewind a video a zillion times and practice it, that's a big advantage.  

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Are flubs more of a regional thing? I've never seen them in the PA / MD area, then again the drumlines are smaller and have no real need of an "intern" type of instrument. The big chore is filling the line. The closest I've seen is Pittsburgh Steelers' Steeline marches 3-4 "boom drums", which are flat bass drums with no bottom heads.

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14 hours ago, Weaklefthand4ever said:

I was going to say. Flubs have been around for a fairly good amount of time and they CAN add some interesting voicing potentially. Not that they DO.....but they CAN. High school lines have been getting better and better for decades. We can complain all we want about the internet, but it definitely has helped on the instruction end. If I can slow down and rewind a video a zillion times and practice it, that's a big advantage.  

Having the flub line definitely makes the whole group better. At least some of those snare and tenor players in Vandegrift's battery probably marched flubs in  past years and were much better prepared to move up because of it.

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16 hours ago, cybersnyder said:

Are flubs more of a regional thing? I've never seen them in the PA / MD area, then again the drumlines are smaller and have no real need of an "intern" type of instrument. The big chore is filling the line. The closest I've seen is Pittsburgh Steelers' Steeline marches 3-4 "boom drums", which are flat bass drums with no bottom heads.

I don't really think so. We have them in the southeast and have for a pretty long time. We have what I would call mid-sized lines here at most of the very large programs. They all seem to follow the 7 snare, 3 or 4 tenor (4 is a bit much for a HS line w/ only 7 snares IMHO,) 5 bass and 67,981 in the front ensemble. Ok...maybe the pit size is a slight exaggeration but they're LARGE. 

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