Encouragement Thread - If you need support let’s help


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Let’s take proactive measures to help each other at least in the mental health area. If you’re bouncing off the walls, feeling panic creep in, or just need a sympathetic ear, post it here and let’s wo

My body has absorbed so much soap and disinfectant, that when I pee, it cleans the toilet. 

Coronials.

3 hours ago, year1buick said:

“Once more unto the breach.”

I start my new job tomorrow. I won’t lie, I feel a little nervous— haven’t touched a handpiece since early March, new city, new job and under a double layer of PPE (including an N95, which I’ve never done before). Should be interesting. The state also recommends taking a change of clothes to put our scrubs into at the end of the day. Plus 2x/day temperature checks. Now if we only had the house situation figured out, LOL. One thing at a time...

patience

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14 hours ago, HockeyDad said:

It’s hard to remember just how prevalent and socially acceptable smoking was. 

Old movies and TV shows will refresh your memory.  And the ads - oh my.  Cigarettes were touted for all sorts of crazy unproven health benefits.  

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10 hours ago, year1buick said:

“Once more unto the breach.”

I start my new job tomorrow. I won’t lie, I feel a little nervous— haven’t touched a handpiece since early March, new city, new job and under a double layer of PPE (including an N95, which I’ve never done before). Should be interesting. The state also recommends taking a change of clothes to put our scrubs into at the end of the day. Plus 2x/day temperature checks. Now if we only had the house situation figured out, LOL. One thing at a time...

Take your time with the PPE and you’ll find you get the hang of it quickly. Annoying yes, but you adjust to it. Just have to slow yourself down and take the time to do it right. 

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2 hours ago, HockeyDad said:

Take your time with the PPE and you’ll find you get the hang of it quickly. Annoying yes, but you adjust to it. Just have to slow yourself down and take the time to do it right. 

....and also consider the potential downside of NOT wearing it. Goes a long way to making it less onerous!

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On 5/22/2020 at 6:16 PM, supersop said:

i've finally decided to use this thread ... as it was intended.

I need encouragement.  13 days ago ... I quit smoking.  First I started using a patch and vaping to get by.  Now I'm just vaping.  I want to wind down to where I'm not putting Nicotine in my body at all.  I Lost my challenge twice so far.  I bought a pack on day 3.  Smoked them all in 24 hours.  I bought another pack on day 8 ... took me 3 days to get rid of them.  I'm craving the real thing really bad ............................................................

 

Need some encouragement!

I am the youngest of 6 children.

My mother smoked like a chimney.  I won't criticize her as she herself had challenges in her life back in the day when smoking was common - and accepted.  She had a great deal to endure as a child. 

She became sick when I was very young.  This was during the time when kids were sheltered from the truth.  We weren't told everything and we had no way to know.  What adults said remained with them and the young were kept in the dark.   

She started to have prolonged stays in the hospital.  When she came out she would have violent vomit attacks in the morning.  Loud attacks - to this day I cannot listen to anyone being sick.  It's as if her attacks shook the whole house.  It was not a large house for a family of 8. 

When she was out of the hospital, she would send me on "errands."  She would fill my hand with bills and change and off I went to the corner store to buy her cigarettes.  Back then there was no question about age, someone as young as myself was not buying them for my own use.   She always made sure to give me extra to buy a small brown bag of surprise candy.  Off I went to get her what she had asked for and to divulge in the candy I got when I came home.

Shortly after she started to invite each of my brothers and sisters into my parents bedroom alone.  Eventually it came to my turn.  I remember the moment.  She told me she was dying and that when she was gone I would have to be strong.  I cried.  I remember being confused.    

As is with youth, the summer continued a short while after that.  Then the day before Labour Day our family was summoned for a trip to the hospital.  We were brought into my mother's hospital room where she laid unconscious, tubes inserted into her nose to assist with breathing.   Nothing was said, at least not to me. 

The next day I was playing at a neighbors down the street.  It was the day before school was going to start.  My sister called me at the neighbors and told me that I had to come home now.  I was mad, why did I have to stop and come home?

My family was all at home when my father had arrived from the hospital.  He brought my mother's best friend with him.  I remember this like it was yesterday.  He came in the front door and announced "Kids - your mother died today."

I would later understand that my mother was violently ill from chemo treatments.  There was one point that the doctors had to tell her that there was no chance, she did not have long.  Her lung cancer has spread.  That is when she chose to tell six children individually that her time was short.   It took me a while later to recognize the strength she had to do this.  She was an only child and wanted a big family to not have her children deal with what she had dealt with. 

We all have different paths.  You now have the chance to take a different direction.

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1 hour ago, Continental said:

I am the youngest of 6 children.

My mother smoked like a chimney.  I won't criticize her as she herself had challenges in her life back in the day when smoking was common - and accepted.  She had a great deal to endure as a child. 

She became sick when I was very young.  This was during the time when kids were sheltered from the truth.  We weren't told everything and we had no way to know.  What adults said remained with them and the young were kept in the dark.   

She started to have prolonged stays in the hospital.  When she came out she would have violent vomit attacks in the morning.  Loud attacks - to this day I cannot listen to anyone being sick.  It's as if her attacks shook the whole house.  It was not a large house for a family of 8. 

When she was out of the hospital, she would send me on "errands."  She would fill my hand with bills and change and off I went to the corner store to buy her cigarettes.  Back then there was no question about age, someone as young as myself was not buying them for my own use.   She always made sure to give me extra to buy a small brown bag of surprise candy.  Off I went to get her what she had asked for and to divulge in the candy I got when I came home.

Shortly after she started to invite each of my brothers and sisters into my parents bedroom alone.  Eventually it came to my turn.  I remember the moment.  She told me she was dying and that when she was gone I would have to be strong.  I cried.  I remember being confused.    

As is with youth, the summer continued a short while after that.  Then the day before Labour Day our family was summoned for a trip to the hospital.  We were brought into my mother's hospital room where she laid unconscious, tubes inserted into her nose to assist with breathing.   Nothing was said, at least not to me. 

The next day I was playing at a neighbors down the street.  It was the day before school was going to start.  My sister called me at the neighbors and told me that I had to come home now.  I was mad, why did I have to stop and come home?

My family was all at home when my father had arrived from the hospital.  He brought my mother's best friend with him.  I remember this like it was yesterday.  He came in the front door and announced "Kids - your mother died today."

I would later understand that my mother was violently ill from chemo treatments.  There was one point that the doctors had to tell her that there was no chance, she did not have long.  Her lung cancer has spread.  That is when she chose to tell six children individually that her time was short.   It took me a while later to recognize the strength she had to do this.  She was an only child and wanted a big family to not have her children deal with what she had dealt with. 

We all have different paths.  You now have the chance to take a different direction.

That was hard to read. Thank you for sharing. My mom died too young also although not due to smoking. As you say, the young ones don’t know what’s going on. I am glad your mom told you and your siblings she was dying, even though you may not have understood. I did not get that talk. I don’t blame my mom or dad, yet it still haunts me. One day, she was just gone. No chance to say goodbye. Ugh. This is the opposite of encouraging. Sorry. 

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1 hour ago, Continental said:

I am the youngest of 6 children.

My mother smoked like a chimney.  I won't criticize her as she herself had challenges in her life back in the day when smoking was common - and accepted.  She had a great deal to endure as a child. 

She became sick when I was very young.  This was during the time when kids were sheltered from the truth.  We weren't told everything and we had no way to know.  What adults said remained with them and the young were kept in the dark.   

She started to have prolonged stays in the hospital.  When she came out she would have violent vomit attacks in the morning.  Loud attacks - to this day I cannot listen to anyone being sick.  It's as if her attacks shook the whole house.  It was not a large house for a family of 8. 

When she was out of the hospital, she would send me on "errands."  She would fill my hand with bills and change and off I went to the corner store to buy her cigarettes.  Back then there was no question about age, someone as young as myself was not buying them for my own use.   She always made sure to give me extra to buy a small brown bag of surprise candy.  Off I went to get her what she had asked for and to divulge in the candy I got when I came home.

Shortly after she started to invite each of my brothers and sisters into my parents bedroom alone.  Eventually it came to my turn.  I remember the moment.  She told me she was dying and that when she was gone I would have to be strong.  I cried.  I remember being confused.    

As is with youth, the summer continued a short while after that.  Then the day before Labour Day our family was summoned for a trip to the hospital.  We were brought into my mother's hospital room where she laid unconscious, tubes inserted into her nose to assist with breathing.   Nothing was said, at least not to me. 

The next day I was playing at a neighbors down the street.  It was the day before school was going to start.  My sister called me at the neighbors and told me that I had to come home now.  I was mad, why did I have to stop and come home?

My family was all at home when my father had arrived from the hospital.  He brought my mother's best friend with him.  I remember this like it was yesterday.  He came in the front door and announced "Kids - your mother died today."

I would later understand that my mother was violently ill from chemo treatments.  There was one point that the doctors had to tell her that there was no chance, she did not have long.  Her lung cancer has spread.  That is when she chose to tell six children individually that her time was short.   It took me a while later to recognize the strength she had to do this.  She was an only child and wanted a big family to not have her children deal with what she had dealt with. 

We all have different paths.  You now have the chance to take a different direction.

God Bless you. 

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12 minutes ago, HockeyDad said:

That was hard to read. Thank you for sharing. My mom died too young also although not due to smoking. As you say, the young ones don’t know what’s going on. I am glad your mom told you and your siblings she was dying, even though you may not have understood. I did not get that talk. I don’t blame my mom or dad, yet it still haunts me. One day, she was just gone. No chance to say goodbye. Ugh. This is the opposite of encouraging. Sorry. 

There are times when I call on that strength from my mother when dealing with crap that I face.  

You have faced crap.  I read your posts.  I feel I understand some of what you face as a parent with what you post.  We have differences, in some so many.  Yet we share a lot.  

Thank you for your humility. 

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11 minutes ago, Jeff Ream said:

God Bless you. 

I appreciate that.

We face so much.  So many obstacles.  So many challenges.  

We sometimes put our differences at the forefront to make them the chief obstacles we face.  We then lose the most simple of shared experiences that bring us together. 

A friend of mine lost their significant loved one during this crap we are dealing with.  Colon cancer was the culprit.  Cancer treatments that reduced immunity was the reason that this person died with one person at home.   No family could visit - only a very protected hospice nurse.   It was only a matter of time until they died in their home.  He died two weeks ago.

My friend got the ashes from the funeral home last week.  There has been no service.  It will have to be at a later date.   

We all go through crap.  Every single one of us goes through crap. 

I hope we try to remember that. 

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