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DCI WORLD CLASS EXPANDS TO 165 MEMBERS for the 2022 TOUR


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On 10/9/2021 at 1:32 PM, cixelsyd said:

Pay for itself?

By all means, if corps take on these self-imposed expenses, and tactics such as you outline enable them to chip away at the costs, good for them.  But there is no magical way for all this "stuff" to "pay for itself".  If there was, corps would be buying 100 times as much just to lease/resell for profit.  In that dream world, they should be buying woodwinds whether they use them or not.

I have no idea why you try so hard to minimize, or flat-out deny, the cost of all this "stuff" added to the drum corps activity in recent times.  But it does keep the conversation on topic, so have at it.

You have to remember, once the "stuff" has been used, you have gotten some worth out of it.  Breaking even now becomes a matter of getting your 60 cents on the dollar back.  That 40 cents was used and worth it (at least to the corps).

I don't know what the white balloons and helium cost Suncoast in 1984, but it was worth every penny!

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On 10/9/2021 at 1:32 PM, cixelsyd said:

Pay for itself?

By all means, if corps take on these self-imposed expenses, and tactics such as you outline enable them to chip away at the costs, good for them.  But there is no magical way for all this "stuff" to "pay for itself".  If there was, corps would be buying 100 times as much just to lease/resell for profit.  In that dream world, they should be buying woodwinds whether they use them or not.

I have no idea why you try so hard to minimize, or flat-out deny, the cost of all this "stuff" added to the drum corps activity in recent times.  But it does keep the conversation on topic, so have at it.

sure there is, ask Congress 🙂

Considering a lot of the stuff is bought at cost, and later sold, the loss isn't that great. 

and i dont try to minimize it at all. sure, there is expense yes. But i have seen the other side and how it can generate revenue, and with a little bit of background in the financial world, i know how the smart ones can minimize the impact on the book compared to the big 5...food, fuel, housing, insurance and spring training.

i have said this several times, which you've always ignored, but 4-6 weeks of sitting stationary on some college campus that doesn't come cheap is one of the biggest budget killers.

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5 hours ago, Tenoris4Jazz said:

You have to remember, once the "stuff" has been used, you have gotten some worth out of it.  Breaking even now becomes a matter of getting your 60 cents on the dollar back.  That 40 cents was used and worth it (at least to the corps).

I don't know what the white balloons and helium cost Suncoast in 1984, but it was worth every penny!

over the last 2 years, I have seen some corps consign stuff to a company to sell for them...their deal is i think they get 70% of whats made. and trust me, they dropped a lot of stuff off on MULTIPLE occasions. ( this happens when you go through a few sets of flags and uniforms over a summer). the corps has made some decent change on it.

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7 hours ago, Jeff Ream said:

i have said this several times, which you've always ignored, but 4-6 weeks of sitting stationary on some college campus that doesn't come cheap is one of the biggest budget killers.

I am not ignoring it.  I just have nothing to say about it that has not already been said here.

Thankfully, the 2021 experience might enable some corps to use virtual rehearsal more and more for music.  But learning the visual show still needs to take place in-person.  It will still take a corps about 4 weeks in-person to get properly prepared to present their whole show in competition.  Those corps who can afford to extend that to 5 or 6 weeks (and who have few/no HS kids still stuck in school) will still pay for that advantage.

The budget impact of spring training is in cost of renting facilities (both for rehearsal and housing), and food.  Back in the day, we avoided all of those costs by rehearsing on vacant lots, recruiting locally, and trimming rehearsal hours to allow members to feed themselves and sleep at home each night.  But over time, the richest corps found that legitimate rehearsal fields, out-of-state talent, and the full-time focus of a "moved-in" drum corps were advantages that came within their reach.

Unlike "stuff", there is no practical way to regulate these behaviors.  I doubt rules could be written (much less enforced) to cause corps to abandon their global talent searches, cut back on rehearsal hours, or limit visual shows to only what can safely be performed repeatedly on pavement.  Past threads have illustrated that futility, if I recall correctly.

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14 hours ago, Jeff Ream said:

over the last 2 years, I have seen some corps consign stuff to a company to sell for them...their deal is i think they get 70% of whats made. and trust me, they dropped a lot of stuff off on MULTIPLE occasions. ( this happens when you go through a few sets of flags and uniforms over a summer). the corps has made some decent change on it.

If true, that’s an astoundingly high percentage compared the how consignment typically works.

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13 hours ago, cixelsyd said:

I am not ignoring it.  I just have nothing to say about it that has not already been said here.

Thankfully, the 2021 experience might enable some corps to use virtual rehearsal more and more for music.  But learning the visual show still needs to take place in-person.  It will still take a corps about 4 weeks in-person to get properly prepared to present their whole show in competition.  Those corps who can afford to extend that to 5 or 6 weeks (and who have few/no HS kids still stuck in school) will still pay for that advantage.

The budget impact of spring training is in cost of renting facilities (both for rehearsal and housing), and food.  Back in the day, we avoided all of those costs by rehearsing on vacant lots, recruiting locally, and trimming rehearsal hours to allow members to feed themselves and sleep at home each night.  But over time, the richest corps found that legitimate rehearsal fields, out-of-state talent, and the full-time focus of a "moved-in" drum corps were advantages that came within their reach.

Unlike "stuff", there is no practical way to regulate these behaviors.  I doubt rules could be written (much less enforced) to cause corps to abandon their global talent searches, cut back on rehearsal hours, or limit visual shows to only what can safely be performed repeatedly on pavement.  Past threads have illustrated that futility, if I recall correctly.

if there is one thing drum corps has never done well,, it's learn from mistakes of the past

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9 hours ago, skevinp said:

If true, that’s an astoundingly high percentage compared the how consignment typically works.

it's true. it's a deal set specifically for all world class corps that consign. may be the same for open class and dca too, i'm not sure. 

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22 hours ago, jfcadets said:

Didn't take the time to read replies this time, but it should actually be harder... it's harder to tune more brass

crank the synths up like Crown 19's opener.

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