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Four years ago today the Drum Corps world exploded


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4 hours ago, GUARDLING said:

Often in today's world the accusation even without proof can do alot of lasting damage. Victims all around...sad

agreed. someone i adore was collateral damage in Hopghazi and they were 100% innocent. luckily in time people realized they were not like what Hop was accused of and moved past it

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4 hours ago, JimF-LowBari said:

Thinking of the letters I had to google one time to see what they meant 
NSFW (not safe for work) 😨

not a single curse word. just good old fashioned 22 year of full of his own #### bravado

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17 hours ago, Jeff Ream said:

i was accused by a student many years ago. never touched the student. had to fight like hell to prove my innocence. but it was later discovered the student lied.

 

but i never broke rule #1

Kinda same thing happened to me early in my career. Not quite as serious. Had the band at an away game and happened to spot one of our female trumpet players crying. I mouthed the words "are you ok", to which she shook her head no. I motioned for her to come down to me and she did. She told me what was going on, then a female chaperone escorted her to the bathroom and back. She was fine after. Got to school Monday. A parent reported they saw me making sexually suggestive faces at a female member in the band. When the student saw, she got upset and I made her come out of the stands. I then screamed at her and sent her to the bathroom. WTF. So many interviews later, of course I was cleared. Student was upset because of boyfriend drama and "concerned parent" wasn't a parent of a current student. Her student had graduated years ago and she was there to "support" the school. 

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https://www.yahoo.com/news/teacher-charged-sex-assault-18-090255480.html

First case of an educator with an 18 year old student under the new NH law.  My questions:

1) If convicted, I don't think there is a national system or data base for revoked teaching certificates.  What would prevent this teacher from receiving a new certificate in another state?

2) If convicted & the accused had to register as a sex offender, is there a national data base for those types of felonies?  (I think they have to notify their local law enforcement of any relocation, etc.)

Note: some states have their  laws protecting students up to age 19.  (example below)

"A person commits the crime of being a school employee engaging in a sex act or deviant sexual intercourse with a student under the age of 19 years if he/she is a school employee and engages in a sex act or deviant sexual intercourse with a student, regardless of whether the student is male or female." 

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53 minutes ago, keystone3ply said:

https://www.yahoo.com/news/teacher-charged-sex-assault-18-090255480.html

First case of an educator with an 18 year old student under the new NH law.  My questions:

1) If convicted, I don't think there is a national system or data base for revoked teaching certificates.  What would prevent this teacher from receiving a new certificate in another state?

2) If convicted & the accused had to register as a sex offender, is there a national data base for those types of felonies?  (I think they have to notify their local law enforcement of any relocation, etc.)

Note: some states have their  laws protecting students up to age 19.  (example below)

"A person commits the crime of being a school employee engaging in a sex act or deviant sexual intercourse with a student under the age of 19 years if he/she is a school employee and engages in a sex act or deviant sexual intercourse with a student, regardless of whether the student is male or female." 

Someone can correct but pretty sure there is a national database for sexual offenses against minors (aka Meghan’s list). But for offenses against adults…. good question.  
And definitely penalties for not informing law enforcement of change in location.

And after found guilty the Meghan’s list is open to all. In my area someone tried to make money by sending a free magazine of all offenders in a 6 county area. Then subscription offer to “keep up to date”. Sad part was of the hundreds of people listed, I knew 4 of them (2 from work, 2 distant in laws).

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19 minutes ago, JimF-LowBari said:

Someone can correct but pretty sure there is a national database for sexual offenses against minors (aka Meghan’s list). But for offenses against adults…. good question.  
And definitely penalties for not informing law enforcement of change in location.

And after found guilty the Meghan’s list is open to all. In my area someone tried to make money by sending a free magazine of all offenders in a 6 county area. Then subscription offer to “keep up to date”. Sad part was of the hundreds of people listed, I knew 4 of them (2 from work, 2 distant in laws).

Jim-

You are the tech guy so may know the answer to this question:

Is it possible to create some kind of search engine where a hiring official could enter a name, & it goes to each state or jurisdiction's official databases and see if the individual has been charged/convicted/accused (whatever the correct term is) in the past?

I know there are search engines that show up in Google if one is looking up a name; you get a whole list of possible locations, & then they ask for money.  I guess what I am thinking of is something like this, but more robust & looking only at real, no BS data bases.  It would have to be adequately funded for both startup as well as maintenance , so where the $ come from will be an issue.  

I recall hearing somewhere that before the FBI centralized fingerprint records, each state had their own system and that led to offenders falling through the cracks, esp if the states were far apart (Idaho law enforcement interacts often with Utah, but Florida, not so much).  There were difficult work-arounds, but that took time (& thus money).  And once fingerprints started being scanned digitally the FBI stepped up as a repository.

I'll stop rambling now.

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1 hour ago, IllianaLancerContra said:

Jim-

You are the tech guy so may know the answer to this question:

Is it possible to create some kind of search engine where a hiring official could enter a name, & it goes to each state or jurisdiction's official databases and see if the individual has been charged/convicted/accused (whatever the correct term is) in the past?

I know there are search engines that show up in Google if one is looking up a name; you get a whole list of possible locations, & then they ask for money.  I guess what I am thinking of is something like this, but more robust & looking only at real, no BS data bases.  It would have to be adequately funded for both startup as well as maintenance , so where the $ come from will be an issue.  

I recall hearing somewhere that before the FBI centralized fingerprint records, each state had their own system and that led to offenders falling through the cracks, esp if the states were far apart (Idaho law enforcement interacts often with Utah, but Florida, not so much).  There were difficult work-arounds, but that took time (& thus money).  And once fingerprints started being scanned digitally the FBI stepped up as a repository.

I'll stop rambling now.

The (rhymes with witch) is the security and in hooking up to multiple officials databases. Thinking one webpage to start the search but then that connects to (ugh) how many individual databases. Can just see it as too many places it can be hacked. And if  a place changes software (going to be databases from different companies and different versions for each one 🤯) or web address and forgets to tell the people running the search website. 🤬 (been there, don’t miss it)
And how much can we trust the people who are checking for names. Can you trust them that they are not digging for dirt on someone. (That’s why I needed a security clearance before I got access.)
At the least each hiring group would need an account/password so outside people couldn’t just access the search engine. Lot of accounts for the search engine people to keep track of. And the hiring group would have to make sure the account/password only goes to the right people (see digging dirt comment above).

Lol yeah this is part of what I did for a living 🤪🤪🤪🤪🤪🤪🤪


FBI and fingerprints? Never heard of it 😆. Very first day of work was fingerprinted and they were sent to FBI. If I commit a crime and leave a print, I’m screwed…. 😨

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41 minutes ago, JimF-LowBari said:

The (rhymes with witch) is the security and in hooking up to multiple officials databases. Thinking one webpage to start the search but then that connects to (ugh) how many individual databases. Can just see it as too many places it can be hacked. And if  a place changes software (going to be databases from different companies and different versions for each one 🤯) or web address and forgets to tell the people running the search website. 🤬 (been there, don’t miss it)
And how much can we trust the people who are checking for names. Can you trust them that they are not digging for dirt on someone. (That’s why I needed a security clearance before I got access.)
At the least each hiring group would need an account/password so outside people couldn’t just access the search engine. Lot of accounts for the search engine people to keep track of. And the hiring group would have to make sure the account/password only goes to the right people (see digging dirt comment above).

Lol yeah this is part of what I did for a living 🤪🤪🤪🤪🤪🤪🤪


FBI and fingerprints? Never heard of it 😆. Very first day of work was fingerprinted and they were sent to FBI. If I commit a crime and leave a print, I’m screwed…. 😨

the DOJ currently maintains at least 4 databases relating to adult and protected age group abuse that I know of.  access would not typically be available for general inquiries but reserved for law enforcement, though I do believe there are ways in which legitimate need access can be arranged. 

and I've been fingerprinted so many times for my line of work I fear a mismatch is going to happen.

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30 minutes ago, JohnZ said:

the DOJ currently maintains at least 4 databases relating to adult and protected age group abuse that I know of.  access would not typically be available for general inquiries but reserved for law enforcement, though I do believe there are ways in which legitimate need access can be arranged. 

and I've been fingerprinted so many times for my line of work I fear a mismatch is going to happen.

Giving you a like for that info John 👍 

And sure it’s a huge grey area when a corps has issues with a member, staff or volunteer that are not criminal acts. Off top of my head thinking non-sexual harassment (aka bullying). Would help if a bully could not just switch corps because no one in the new corps knows….

Edited by JimF-LowBari
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35 minutes ago, JimF-LowBari said:

Giving you a like for that info John 👍 

And sure it’s a huge grey area when a corps has issues with a member, staff or volunteer that are not criminal acts. Off top of my head thinking non-sexual harassment (aka bullying). Would help if a bully could not just switch corps because no one in the new corps knows….

Teaching styles for most are quite known. Bullying can also be viewed quit diffrently in some cases. Was it actually bulling or a staff member being tuff. Is someone bullied or just doesn'tlike to be critized, I've seen both hundreds of times over the years. 

Actual bulling or degrading is quite different and the corps management needs to be held accountable for their staff in all aspects. If management is not aware of all staff behaviors then they aren't good at their jobs and responsibilities. If management is the actual bully, then that's another issue.

As I said earlier, an accusation needs to be investigated not just assume, nor follow someone innocent. If all accusations on all subjects went into a data base I think few peoples names would be off that list.

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