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Valveless Bugle?

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Is it possible to play all twelve major scales or actual pieces of music on a valveless bugle? I am thinking about selling my trumpet and just getting a bugle for my service in Bugles Across America. I am strongly considering the American Heritage Field Trumpet. What do you guys think?

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Is it possible to play all twelve major scales or actual pieces of music on a valveless bugle? I am thinking about selling my trumpet and just getting a bugle for my service in Bugles Across America. I am strongly considering the American Heritage Field Trumpet. What do you guys think?

I think it could be a neat effect. I'm not sure you could play all 12 major scales or why you would want to, although it would be a neat trick.

Don't sell your trumpet. Bugles are pretty cheap, I would save for one if I wanted it that badly.

If you're playing for "Bugles Across America", to which many of us belong, I don't think it matters so much if you play on a trumpet or a bugle, so long as you are able to serve.

It is an honor, no matter the horn or key, to have taps played by a live performer, for all concerned...and the grieving parties aren't going to check to see if you used a trumpet or a valveless bugle.

Just my 2 cents. Perhaps only 1 cent coming from me.

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If you play high enough, you don't really need valves. But for your scales and intonations sake, you need valves. At least for us mediocre types anyway.

I have a Getzen AHFT and it's a fine horn. Now if you use the G crook, it's not as fine. It just speaks and slots better on the Bb side. At least for the low end(brass) version I got, not the elite.

I did get a horn with valves (eventually) because it's just a lot more fun to practice on. Scales, chromatics, and half valve effects are just easier to do with valves. You could probably do them on a valveless bugle, but it's a lot of work. And playing in areas where the horn doesn't naturally go can screw with your chops and tone. At least when done in excess.

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Oh, cool! So I am also considering a Kanstul g bugle. What's the difference in a powerbore soprano and a regular one? Since I want to march in a corps that plays g bugles. Thanks for the help!

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If you're thinking about buying the Kanstul, most (if not all) of the corps that march Kanstul "G" lines use the powerbore horn.

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The term or name powerbore is a marketing gimmick. What corps doesn't want more power?

The horn may have specific tendencies to being freeblowing, but that doesn't help everyone.

If YOU don't play well or can't play loud, guess what?...

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If YOU don't play well or can't play loud, guess what?...

:blink:

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The term or name powerbore is a marketing gimmick. What corps doesn't want more power?

The horn may have specific tendencies to being freeblowing, but that doesn't help everyone.

If YOU don't play well or can't play loud, guess what?...

it's not even trademarked as far as i could tell. i thought the King sopranos called "powerbore" first? i don't know.

seems like Wayne Downey once said they developed the powerbore to be more for the lead players anyway.

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it's not even trademarked as far as i could tell. i thought the King sopranos called "powerbore" first? i don't know.

seems like Wayne Downey once said they developed the powerbore to be more for the lead players anyway.

WAY back in 1969 we got a new set of Getzen Powerbore bugles. Piston and slide, as they were cheaper than the piston/rotor and they were gold lacquer. It was a long time ago, but if my memory serves me it said, "Powerbore", on the mouthpiece receiver.

Bore size is very subjective and related mostly to how an individual plays. Some people have learned to make the resistance of a smaller bore work for them and for other people they need a more open blowing horn. However, a larger bore doesn't guarantee free blowing.

It's a marketing gimmick, basically.

Edited by Martybucs

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Oh, cool! So I am also considering a Kanstul g bugle. What's the difference in a powerbore soprano and a regular one? Since I want to march in a corps that plays g bugles. Thanks for the help!

Do not get the Kanstul Powerbore if you have a choice between it ands the regular straight bore.

It is not a gimmick - I used to have one but sold in back to the corps.

It takes a lot of air, more so than the regular bore.

I have been using a Deg which I like, but I've been looking for a K reg bore.

I have played both K's and I can play higher on the reg bore.

The reg bore is also a little cheaper.

Darth Vayda

NY SKY alumni

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