Brass Advantage with Wayne Downey
Issue 19

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Welcome back to the land of “All Things Brass.” This installment of Brass Advantage is dedicated to a topic that I regard as a one of the most important factors in a brass players success, proper lip care and maintenance. The article was authored by Dan Gosling, the ChopSaver Guy and includes invaluable information for brass players that perform indoors or on the marching band field… Enjoy


Brass Players – Think Like an Athlete and Ride the Wave to Success

As a professional trumpet player for 25 years and as the creator of ChopSaver lip balm, I feel I am uniquely qualified to write about good, common-sense lip care. Through both my studies on the trumpet and in my consultations with other experts during the creation of the product, I have learned a great deal about the lips and lip maintenance. Much of what I have learned came through simple trial and error. My hope is to help you avoid some of those errors.

For starters, let’s take a crash course in anatomy. Our lips and the muscles that make up our embouchure are a complex arrangement of muscle and tissue. The skin covering our lips is much thinner than the skin covering the rest of our body – which is why your lips are red and very sensitive. It’s also why they’re capable of creating beautiful sounds when buzzed properly.

In the same way you don’t need to be a mechanic to drive a car, you don’t need to know a lot more about how the lips function in order to play well. But knowing how to care for your lips and avoid accidents can help you play longer and with less discomfort. After all, “lip care” isn’t something you should think about only after you play or when you have a problem, any more than auto maintenance is something you should think about only after a long trip or a crash.

Be a Musical Athlete

A successful athlete is keenly aware of everything he does, from eating well and getting enough rest to following a training regimen that builds without destroying muscle tissue. As brass players, we should think of our lips, embouchure and body in the same way. For our purposes, let’s use a long distance runner (an athlete that focuses on endurance and efficiency as opposed to brute strength) as our model.

Taking care of your lips should include good practice and playing habits. Basic concepts like good posture and always taking a full, relaxed breath are important, but easy to forget. Think of your lips as sails on a boat – they both work better with a nice, full supply of wind.

While we certainly can’t expect our lips and embouchure to get stronger by babying them, they can be severely damaged by overuse and abuse. Forgot the old mantra of “No pain, No gain.” Today’s athletes alternate their workouts in a pattern of “Stress” followed by “Recovery.” If we don’t include Recovery (or adequate resting) in any sort of physical activity, our bodies will force us to rest by breaking down. Pain and discomfort are how our body talks to us and a smart musician/athlete learns to listens.

Generally speaking, muscles swell up when used, and the lips are no exception. However, there is a difference between being “a little sore and puffy” and sharp pain. If you are a little sore and fatigued after playing, your body is saying, “You should stop soon and take it easy during your next practice session.” True pain means “Stop immediately and step away from the horn as soon as possible!”

How to Create More Good Days

Here is another way to illustrate the Stress/Recovery concept. Let’s say you’ve had a really good day. Maybe you’ve finally nailed the high lick in a piece you’ve been working on. The temptation is to do it many times just to make sure you’ve got it and, after all, it’s fun. But you need to resist that temptation. Play the lick a few times, but DO NOT pound on it over and over.

Why? Because, to achieve that new plateau, you have just experienced a peak moment (Stress), and peak moments should always be followed by a valley (Recovery). That’s the way your body works. So, you can either fight Mother Nature or work with her. (She always wins, by the way.) Have the discipline to take it a little easy the next day. And then the following day, your patience will be rewarded by being fresh AND strong and having an even better day. Trust me on this. If I had understood this concept as a young player, I would have avoided a LOT of frustration.

Think about that distance runner. He considers the stress/recovery model as a process of creating waves and learning how to ride them to success. He’ll taper off his training before a big event, essentially creating a wave in reverse (Recovery before Stress). You can do this, too: If you have a hard performance on a Saturday (Stress), plan ahead by tapering off a bit the days leading up to it (Recovery). You’ll generate a wave or peak when you really need to be at your best. Remember: Range and power come from efficiency, not brute strength. Efficient chops feel responsive and fresh, not sore and beat up.

People often say, “Rest as much as you play.” This is generally good advice, but it doesn’t necessarily mean play an hour, rest an hour, play an hour, rest an hour all day long. Here’s how I interpret that advice: Let’s say you have an hour to practice. Warm up (flap your lips, maybe buzz on the mouthpiece and play a few scales or a simple tune you like) for 5 minutes. Then rest for at least 2 or 3 minutes. Then work on some fundamentals like scales and lip slurs for 10 minutes or so. Rest for 10 minutes. Finally, spend a good 30 minutes working on the music you currently are learning (school music, a solo or etudes). But be sure to take the horn off the chops every now and then during those 30 minutes.

You can even set a timer to help you maintain your discipline. If you only have one hour a day, then you can rest until the next day knowing you have used your time well. If you are really trying to build some strength and endurance, try to establish two practice sessions seven to eight hours apart.

Now that you have some practice discipline established, I urge you again to apply the Stress/Recovery model. A “hard” day or practice session ideally should be followed by a lighter one. Here is where you have to become your own best coach. Keep in mind that what is “hard” for one person might be very “easy” for another. Don’t compare yourself to your peers, just stay on your own path to success and you’ll be fine. Everyone develops at different rates.

Help in an Emergency

Of course, life doesn’t always unfold this neatly and sometimes we over-do, for a variety of reasons. In those cases, use the same therapeutic techniques that athletic trainers prescribe for abused muscle tissue such as alternating cold (to reduce swelling) and heat (to promote blood flow). An ice cube can be applied much in the same way you would suck on a Popsicle. For heat, soak a wash cloth in warm water and gently press on to your lips and face. Just a few minutes at a time with either procedure is adequate and will stimulate healing. Also, use your hands and fingers to massage the face and lip muscles (yes, ChopSaver does work well for this!), keeping in mind that an embouchure is formed with the muscles of the jaw, chin, cheeks and neck, not just the lips and corners.

This is especially helpful if you are playing outdoors in cold weather. Very soft playing at the end of a practice session is a great way to bring overblown chops back into focus, just like slow jogging helps an athlete cool down after a workout. In extreme cases, an anti-inflammatory such as aspirin or ibuprofen can be used. Always follow label instructions when using any sort of medication, even something as common as aspirin.

Hopefully, these tips will help you create a disciplined, goal-oriented approach to your practice and help you spend more time making great music and less time complaining about sore, tired chops.

Well that’s all for this issue, stay tuned for more exciting news on brass technique in the next issue of “Brass Advantage.”

If you have checked my newest original composition for marching band titled “Conquests of the Conquistador” log onto www.xtremebrass.com for both audio and PDF score previews of the show. Exclusivity and Regional Protection is available, so log on now and “Check Availability” in your area. This Fiery Hot, Heart Pounding, Spanish Show Stopper is sure to be the crowds favorite at football games and competitions alike as well as a show that your students will love to play and audiences will always remember.

Don’t forget to check out all the new brass and percussion technique books on my website. This month I’m highlighting my newest book titled “XtremeMarching & Playing Technique” which comes with both Wind and Percussion scores/parts complete with accompanying marching exercises on Pyware drill sheets. If you’re a drummer don’t forget the drum cadences, drumsticks, CDs and DVDs on my website at www.XtremeBrass.com & www.XtremePercussion.com, send your questions or topics to: AskWayneDowney [at] drumcorpsplanet [dot] com. askwaynedowney [at] drumcorpsplanet [dot] com

“Don’t Let The Chance Pass You By”. See Ya Soon…

Wayne

Dan Gosling has degrees in Trumpet Performance from the University of Illinois and Northwestern University and has performed in every genre available to a modern day player, including symphonic, opera, ballet, jazz, chamber music, solo recitals and studio recording. Dan has served as Principal Trumpet of the Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra and has done extensive work with the Cincinnati Symphony and Pops Orchestras, the Louisville Orchestra and the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra.

In the summer of 2004, Dan created the formula for ChopSaver lip care, an all natural combination of herbs and natural oils and butters. Today, ChopSaver is recognized as the serious wind player’s choice for lip maintenance and is used and endorsed by such luminaries as Philip Smith (Principal Trumpet, New York Philharmonic) Arturo Sandoval (jazz trumpet legend), Jay Friedman (Principal Trombone, Chicago Symphony Orchestra) and Sir James Galway (world renowned flute virtuoso) – just to name a few. To learn more and to contact Dan, please visit www.chopsaver.com.

Publisher’s Note:
Wayne Downey is the first of Drum Corps Planet’s panel of subject-matter expert columnists – providing our readers with expert information and insight from the best teachers and leaders in the drum and bugle corps activity. In addition to his long-term role as Music Director of the 12-time DCI World Champion Blue Devils drum and bugle corps – where he’s won 20 Jim Ott awards for "Excellence in Brass Performance", Wayne is distinguished as one of the finest brass teachers/clinicians and arrangers in the world. His work has been featured by some of the world’s most-respected drum corps, high school and collegiate bands – as well as the Tony and Emmy award winning show "Blast" and in feature films. In 1991 Wayne was inducted into the Drum Corps International Hall of Fame for his contributions to the Drum & Bugle Corps activity as the musical director for the
Blue Devils. Wayne’s latest venture – XtremeBrass.com provides brass players of all ages and skill-levels, as well as educators, personalized lessons and access to his championship-winning techniques and methods. We’re honored to have him as one of our contributing columnists. -jmd

About the Author:
Wayne Downey was the first of Drum Corps Planet’s panel of subject-matter expert columnists – providing our readers with expert information and insight from the best teachers and leaders in the drum and bugle corps activity. In addition to his long-term role as Music Director of the 14-time DCI World Champion Blue Devils drum and bugle corps – where he’s won 21 Jim Ott awards for “Excellence in Brass Performance”, Wayne is distinguished as one of the finest brass teachers/clinicians and arrangers in the world. His work has been featured by some of the world’s most-respected drum corps, high school and collegiate bands – as well as the Tony and Emmy award winning show “Blast” and in feature films. In 1991 Wayne was inducted into the Drum Corps International Hall of Fame for his contributions to the Drum & Bugle Corps activity as the musical director for the Blue Devils. Wayne’s latest venture – XtremeBrass.com provides brass players of all ages and skill-levels, as well as educators, personalized lessons and access to his championship-winning techniques and methods.

Posted by on Friday, August 14th, 2009. Filed under Brass Advantage.