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Jimisback

G bugles louder that Bb?

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In order to properly test and settle this one and for all, you would need a method of putting the exact same stresses on any given horn in terms of air volume, air speed, embesure, pressure, etc in order to make sure all the horns are producing sound under the same conditions.

You'd also need to test a representative sample of brass through the years...Dynasty, King, and Kanstul Bb, Kanstul and dynasty 3 valve G, King, Dynasty, Olds,and American Heritage 2 valve, Olds, and whatever valve rotor, etc.

You'd best have a complete choir and test individual horns for measured volume throughout teh range (since higher pitches can sound louder due to better projection), as well as full choirs on a single note and in chord.

Test would best be done outside ina large stadium setting, with meters at field level, mid stand, and up in teh GE box.

Cover ALL the bases and one could actually settle this stupid argument.

and even THEN some wouldn;t believe the results, because each individual person may actually hear the sounds differently...

Now Sam. . . don't go getting all "making sense" on everyone!

:laugh::laugh::music:

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Only a couple issues with that--we don't hear sound power levels, we hear sound pressure levels.

OK, I wasn't minding my terminology. If we're going to delve into the math, what I was referring to was sound pressure.

A 3 dB change in the sound pressure level amounts to a doubling of the input power--i.e. 2 trumpets will be 3 dB louder than 1 trumpet, 1000 trumpets will be 3 dB louder than 500 trumpets.

However, our ears perceive sound logarithmically.

....which is where a 6 dB difference in sound pressure equates to a perceived doubling.

3 dB difference is barely audible.

That is not correct. I believe I read somewhere that 1 dB is the generally acknowledged threshold at which the typical human ear notices a difference. I know mine notice a 1 dB change.

10 dB difference is perceived as a doubling in loudness.

That should be 6 dB - or are you talking about sound power ratios now?

For anyone to notice anything significant, there would need to be at least a 5 dB difference in the sound pressure levels. You can get that roughly by going from 64 horns to 256 horns.

Don't think so. Think about it - don't you notice the difference between 32 horns and 64 horns?

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I only have one thing to say on this subject ....

lovelampsm.jpg

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Now Sam. . . don't go getting all "making sense" on everyone!

:laugh::laugh::music:

Cant help it, Chuck....it just comes to me!!!

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