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Regarding the past.

I played snare in SCV 78, and the winter and spring of 79'.

Both years were on match grip.

I was trained raised to play traditional Dave Mauldin, Paul Seaberg, Steve Chorazy. Everyone who made the line all had extensive experience playing traditional grip.

It did indeed open up several sweet opportunities during the show. In 78' check out the final push of the opener. The snare line is playing alternating what appears to be back sticking but is actually the sticks are moving around in unison at alternating 90 degree angles between fast diddle passages. The drum solo had some serious sticking passages that were very challenging to master. The night of finals we wipped out the traditional grip during the push of the closer just before the Bottle Dance.

I play traditional once again and I have respect for either grip.

Regarding the current scene.

The only way SCV can smack their drums any harder will have to be match. The cats who have come up from the Cadets know more about the corps traditions and history and have amazing chops.

Jonz!

Mom

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  • 1 month later...

Alright.

matched is better - period.

BUT this is another example of SCV trying to be the philosophers of DCI.

Traditional advocates need to get over it - and as far as SCV is concerned, please - continue to amuse me.

that is all.

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Alright.

matched is better - period.

BUT this is another example of SCV trying to be the philosophers of DCI.

Traditional advocates need to get over it - and as far as SCV is concerned, please - continue to amuse me.

that is all.

It's your opinion that matched grip is better, fine, that's your opinion, period. I play traditional and have for years, and there's nothing I need to "get over". There's room in this world for both grips and more than one opinion. BTW, how many years of marching experience do you have? Maybe we'll be more amused than you.

Edited by oldtimedrummer
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right palm down/left palm up

Not to single out this particular post, but to respond to the thread in general...

The concept of "left palm up" is a weird evolution since the 70's. The classic Bobby Thompson traditional grip is a verticle hand grip, thumb up, NOT palm up. (See the old Bridgemen lines for an example, no palms up there.) Palm up is a weak stance to the drum.

As it was explained to me by Brian Callahan (a student of Thompson and DeLucia)... traditional grip produces a wipping motion which compensates for the weaker left hand. The left hand should be in pretty much the same position as if you were shaking hands with someone. This can produce quite a bit of power.

FYI

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  • 5 months later...
I remember reading somewhere that their caption head wanted to "unify" the sound and motion between the tenors and the snares. Only thing I can actually see being unified is during their percussion features when they have the 1 tenor, 2 snares, 1 tenor, etc. etc., which makes things look more leveled.

Someone correct this if it's wrong.

Yes i totally agree with you, in their Double beat, it looked amazing to see the 1 tenor, two snares lineup. it just looked nice. and i think its good when a corp changes it up and does something no one else is doing

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  • 2 weeks later...

and it's funny that at least 3 other corps (including BD) did it at least one or two times in their show, but SCV, who warmed up in an integrated arc, did not...

oh well

lol

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Tradish has had no real purpose since hi-stepper drum carriers were introduced to keep the playing surface level. It has remained for three reasons:

  1. Homage to the past - for hundreds of years, snare drummers had to use the grip to accommodate the awkward positioning of sling-carried drums. For many years, the snare drum was called the "side drum."
  2. Visual appeal - Complex backsticking patterns never go out of style, and tradish allows for many more interesting visuals. It looks cool.
  3. Elitism/sense of superiority through the creation of artificial demand on players. Tradish fans love to crow "Matched Grip Sucks!" as they fuzz roll after roll (mostly through crushing drags and tap rolls), struggle with "helicoptering" (unevenly pulsed long rolls), and subliminally flip their left hands over during impacts, trying carefully not to hit the rim and lose the stick on the way back.

On one hand, it is safe to say that Tradish has stayed on for the same reason pro baseball doesn't allow aluminum bats. It doesn't give any extra physical advantage. The lines that use it have to work harder to clean and balance things out. On the other hand, it makes sense for drum corps, as it is congruent with the work ethic corps is known for. Overcoming adverse conditions are the hallmark of drum corps.

I have used both grips, having played snare and tenors. When I pick up sticks, though, I usally revert to tradish first. Habit has made it my "default" setting. It may be the case the whole corps scene over. Some of my favorite DCI lines (L'Insolite for one - man, I miss those guys!) played matched. Matched allows for extra-intricate writing and a greater dynamic range. Less chance of injury as well, not to mention an even tan for both arms!

I like both.

Edited by jascd
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