The Oz

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  1. I've been thinking it looks like a Kevin some of us were friendly with in the late 60s. The horn, time, and name are familiar. The memory of the face is very vague.
  2. I stand by what I wrote, despite the list of eminent physicists musicians you present as a counter argument. If any of those gentlemen have written a peer reviewed paper on the subject, I would be happy to consider it in relation to my statements. [sorry, the strikeout tag isn't working. The word "physicists" should be so formatted.]
  3. Didn't' Vince Bruni say something similar, along the lines of, "There is no benefit to Bb"?
  4. With all due respect … The concept that intonation is, “The #1 overriding factor in volume” is hogwash. Volume is determined by the transfer of power (see note below) from the source to the receiver. In this case, from a horn to an ear using air as the medium of transfer. The more power the source can put into the air, the more power will be presented to the receiver. Given multiple sources, the total power put into the air is the sum of the power of each source. It doesn’t matter if the two hours are playing the same note, the same note but not in tune, or different notes. It’s the sum of the power across all sources. The “perceived” volume argument is similarly a canard. Most often the physics cited is the additive effect of in-phase waveforms. Believe me, no horn player short of Gabriel can control the phase of a horn. Even if they could and even if the waveforms were in phase at one ear of a listener, they would be out of phase at the other ear. The only answer to this argument is to measure the power output of G and Bb instruments. I’ve not performed that experiment and know of no papers on the subject. Can we please end this discussion? Thank you, Mr. Wizard Note: Power is the rate at which work is done or energy is transmitted. Energy is the capacity to do work. Energy is power delivered over time. For this discussion, either power or energy is acceptable.
  5. Good stadium; a little upmarket from Rochester. Single deck on four sides. Seats 18.5k. (Designed to add a second deck.) Grass field. The sideline should be right next to the stands. Full view of the field from any seat. There may be some good places in Chester, but I don't know where they are and would not be interested in exploring. Tailgating before the event should be OK in the stadium parking lots. I would plan on leaving very soon after the show.
  6. There is a web site: http://www.philapolicecadets.org/
  7. Interesting; thanks. In addition to being a pain to keep clean, the leg apron would inevitably ride around your leg and the end of the leg rest would perversely slide under the edge of the apron. Being an ROTC band and not drum corps, you could reach down and put things right without incurring a tic or two. The other option was to tighten the strap enough to cut off circulation.
  8. Yup, it’s that simple. My ROTC band used leather “leg aprons” to eliminate wear on the uniform trousers and a strap around the leg connected to the ends of the leg rest to tie the drum to the leg. The apron was white and a pain to keep clean and the strap was useless. (The bass drummer had a full apron, talk about much too much time spent keeping it clean. We didn’t use aprons or leg straps in Reading. You had to anticipate the drum movement. After a while, it became second nature, although windy days could make life interesting. Edit - Dang! I actually found a picture of a leg apron:
  9. Andrew, my post was very much tongue-in-cheek. If a hat makes a difference in scoring, I lose a little respect for the contest. Differences in style should not be penalized.
  10. Now if we could just convince the Cabs to update their style and go with shakos.
  11. (Hoping my memory isn’t completely on the fritz …) I believe I marched in a line with eleven bass drums. Two guys each carrying double drums and a third guy with a triple set. Then four guys with traditionally-carried bass drums. (OK, call the triples tenors; that still totals eight bass drums.)
  12. If he bases it in a certain New York town, the corps would have the circularly referential name of the Fredonia Fredonia Drum Corps.
  13. Don't forget another big expense ... salaries. A non-profit can put cash into its employees pockets. Within reason, of course. But then "reason" is subject to interpretation.