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perc2100

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perc2100 last won the day on May 4 2016

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  1. IDK, I kinda adore that ballad, and the visual presentation that went along with it. I've heard from many who marched in 1991 how many boo's they received in some towns (coughTheSouthcough) over the end of that ballad 'story' and the coupling. I dig that show and agree that's it a bit of an underrated Cadets classic (that must've been hell to perform as a snare drummer, with a tenor harness sitting pretty high-up to clear the snare harness that rode a big low). Honestly, I feel like Cadets from, like, 1982 through the early/mid 00's was one banger of a show after another; even their 'missteps' were adventurous and I often 'respected' their designs years I didn't like them
  2. Sure; I'm just pointing out that Star wasn't necessarily run as a "throw money at everything!" drum corps the way some people may have thought. Yes, they had money, and viable investments, but they also spent wisely to minimize costs
  3. Not only that, they were more frugal than I think the average fan knew: used the same 2-valve horns their entire existence, and their "different uniforms every year," with some exceptions, were mostly just adding a bit of fabric here or there, changing gauntlets or shakos, etc. They had resources and also spent wisely
  4. FWIW I've had some students recently who went from SCVC (where they were talented but true drum corps rookies) to the SCV in the percussion section: maybe it's just a legit talent factor. I mean, if you have the talent at your feet to choose from as caption heads, why not go with the best? Also, at least one I can think of off the top of my head auditioned for the A corps, and was 'placed' in SCVC where they won Open Class, then went and marched the A corps the next season.
  5. Right, I forgot about Blue Stars as well (though the mid-1980's was before my drum corps-following time). They did a great job of reorganizing and gradually making their way back first as a successful A60 corps (I do remember when they were perennial A60 Champ contenders - I remember when they were duking it out w/Div 2 Limited Edition in 1989, with both corps playing Carmina Burana), then back to Open/World Class status, and now perpetual Finalists. Another good example of a corps successfully reorganizing financially and returning, thanks for the reminder!
  6. Oh yeah, good point! They've been such a solid corps the last several seasons I totally forgot they took 2006 off! That year off seemed to be great for them. Not only have they not placed as low as they did in 2005 (22nd), but: * five seasons before they took a year of: average placement = 21 * five seasons immediately after coming back from a year off = 15 With two finalists placements in the 14 years since their return (including a 12th place finish their third season back: their first Top 12 Finalist finish since 1986)!
  7. So who can tell us what the most successful corps is that's taken a year off and come back? Is there a current corps now that took a year or two off to reorganize and sustained viability? I know Magic of Orlando took two years off and came back immediately into Finals (after having to compete in Open Class throughout the season: the only corps to win Open Class, then make Finals later that week IIRC), but they couldn't sustain and were only to field a corps for 5 years when they returned (only 2 of which made Finals). I can't think of a more successful story of a corps coming back from a year or two off, and certainly no corps that came back and returned to financial stability long-term. As mentioned, WGI groups do this relatively frequently, especially guards, so maybe this is a more financially stable/viable alternative for DCI corps in the future: a 'one year off/two years on' kind of business model, perhaps. IDK; I'm trying to think of a positive outcome for SCV here from a historical perspective. Obviously has lived by their name, being at the vanguard/forefront of the activity so if any corps can defy history it's SCV.
  8. And this isn't a new thing. I've known ladies who were rejected from a certain Top 12 Illinois drum corps in the early 90's for being above the weight requirement; and conversely others who were rejected for being below the height requirement. I've heard stories (from members AND instructors) of this happening in the 00's as well. Corps who have the luxury of having 1000 people coming to audition for 75 open spots want to take the perfect rookies. I'm not saying that's right, but that's reality (and, some of those corps won multiple championships with that ethos, so I'm sure those staffers would say that WAS right for that moment)
  9. In San Diego many of the local theater programs, even the 'big' ones that develop Tony-winning Broadway shows, have a ton of community outreaches, education programs, etc. Most drum corps: not-so-much (or at all?)
  10. Right, there was at least another corps in 2022 that was looking for housing that week, and even pre-COVID housing with schools could be difficult to come by. By no means am I an insider, and I don't want to imply such; that being said, the fact that even I know that housing is problematic (and, to be fair was problematic/sometimes difficult to find when I marched drum corps in the late 1990's) leads me to think this is a substantial hurdle. I know the school district I work in has increased their requirements of outside groups that want to book facilities in the COVID age, and I've been told those restrictions will likely increase rather than decrease over time, making it difficult/impossible for what amounts to a traveling young adult roadshow to find cheap housing that suits all the needs a modern DCI corps has.
  11. Right, and since many drum corps don't exactly have a big local footprint, it's even harder to solicit donations. I grew up outside of a big city, in a suburb. They were incredibly supportive of their local band programs, but trying to solicit donations for drum corps was impossible: they (strangers who would/did give, say, $100 to a local marching band student in September) were perplexed at the thought of me asking them to donate money for an out-of-state/non-local drum and bugle corps. And that was in the mid-1990's, when the economic situation wasn't as questionable as it is nowadays.
  12. And hard to come by in 2022. SCV, in fact, was having problems finding housing for the San Diego show three days out last summer
  13. DCI being in Indiana for the last decade+ does not benefit CA corps who have to travel across the country for big regionals & finals, then all the way back, _EVERY_ year. Same with WGI. There's a WGI model for units that take a year off to fundraise, then go back and compete for a year or two or three, then take a year off to fundraise, etc. When I was following WGI a lot more than I do now, I remember even Pride of Cincinnati, located about an hour's drive from UD Arena where WGI Finals is, have taken a year off here and there to remain financially solvent. Perhaps that'll be the 'new' trend in DCI, especially for corps who have to travel significant amounts across the country every year.
  14. Planar Analysis. To paraphrase a wise ol wizard, "that is a phrase I haven't heard in a long time. A long time." Wow
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