N.E. Brigand

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N.E. Brigand last won the day on May 19

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About N.E. Brigand

Profile Information

  • Your Drum Corps Experience
    Just a Fan
  • Your Favorite Corps
    Phantom Regiment & Boston Crusaders
  • Your Favorite All Time Corps Performance (Any)
    Santa Clara Vanguard 1999
  • Your Favorite Drum Corps Season
    1989
  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Cleveland, OH
  • Interests
    J.R.R. Tolkien, Cinema, Herpetology, Early Music, Theatre

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  1. N.E. Brigand

    A Message from DCI CEO Dan Acheson

    That quote from Federalist #65 can cut both ways, of course. It's a discussion of the proposed Senate's powers for trying officials who have been impeached. Hamilton explicitly notes that this is a political rather than a judicial proceeding, and in the line which you quote, he's observing not only that an elected official whose conduct was proper might be convicted by members of an opposing party, but also that an elected official who conduct was improper might be acquitted by members of his own party.
  2. N.E. Brigand

    Tarpon Springs - Digital Screens

    Yes and no. We had a similar discussion three years ago when George D. (I think) posted a video of Broken Arrow's show, claiming that it had more G.E. than many drum corps shows. As it happens, Phantom used the same designer a year or two later! And it didn't work out for them. But in the course of the debate about that claim here then, one theme that emerged was that high-end marching bands generate their effect in part by (1) not being nearly as difficult as drum corps and (2) having a lot more people on the field. Actually those two are related in part. A marching band can have a whole lot of people generating visual effect while a whole lot of other people stand still and generate musical effect. Broken Arrow's show that year had even less playing-while-moving than BD's show last year or SCV's show this year.
  3. N.E. Brigand

    Tarpon Springs - Digital Screens

    One last note from me: at the end of their show, Carmel had about 80 people on strings.
  4. N.E. Brigand

    Tarpon Springs - Digital Screens

    Only if it's raining. Dulce et decorum est.
  5. N.E. Brigand

    Tarpon Springs - Digital Screens

    Tarpon Springs (FL) finished fifth. In Semifinals, one set of screens failed, but everything worked fine in Finals. It's just that four other bands were better. One of them was Broken Arrow's (OK) patriotic show, also discussed in this thread, but that band finished fourth. Third place went to Blue Springs (MO), who played an eclectic mix of music notably featuring strong vocal stylings on "What a Wonderful World". Second place went to Avon (IN), whose Romeo & Juliet show contained echoes of the Blue Stars and Kidsgrove Scouts productions of 2017--if they had been set in a fishbowl. And the winner, for the third straight year, was Carmel (IN), whose "Voyage to Valhalla" featured Wagner's Ring, Mahler's second symphony (known here from Carolina Crown's 2010 show) and a large Viking ship.
  6. N.E. Brigand

    A Message from DCI CEO Dan Acheson

    Ah... it depends on how much has changed, doesn't it? What is the current societal norm? What was it in the 1980s, 1990s, etc.? What were instructors getting fired for then?
  7. Can you make arrangements with someone here from the U.S. to receive it and then mail it to you?
  8. N.E. Brigand

    A Message from DCI CEO Dan Acheson

    Sorry, there were two more days of marching bands, you know.
  9. N.E. Brigand

    A Message from DCI CEO Dan Acheson

    Haven't read most of the posts in this thread since late last week, but this report on George Hopkins produced by the law firm YEA! hired (which I would guess has been linked already in this discussion today) is presumably not the story that Nadolny (and others?) was working on. So I remain unsure about whether Acheson's response was the correct one or not.
  10. N.E. Brigand

    Corps Style HS Band Spells Out Racial Slur

    Well, "often" is not always. But as they sing in Avenue Q, "everyone's a little bit racist". (I hadn't seen that story. Thanks for the update.)
  11. N.E. Brigand

    Corps Style HS Band Spells Out Racial Slur

    Yeah, but for something like this, as they sing in South Pacific, "you have to be carefully taught" (or as they sing in Into the Woods, "children will listen"). In other words, kids willing to joke about racial slurs in public often come from families where that sort of thing is tolerated.
  12. N.E. Brigand

    A Message from DCI CEO Dan Acheson

    Which is why I said that if Acheson clearly knew about such allegations and didn't act because the board prevented him from acting, then he should have resigned.
  13. N.E. Brigand

    A Message from DCI CEO Dan Acheson

    I do think that actions not taken before the Hopkins revelations need to be treated differently than actions not taken after the Hopkins revelations--but not unconditionally excused. If Acheson had been confronted with serious allegations and did nothing, regardless of the fact that (perhaps) the board was preventing him from doing something, then that would show him to have weak morals (hypothetically speaking, if the company where you work enables wrongdoing, you have an ethical obligation to speak out or resign) and thus not be the kind of person who should be leading an organization like DCI. But we just don't know enough yet about the situation.
  14. N.E. Brigand

    A Message from DCI CEO Dan Acheson

    Saw another example of this just today, when the New York Times got hold of someone's emails in a story of some possible national interest (it probably gets more attention a week from tomorrow, which is likely to be big news day) and reached out to that person to ask for his explanation of what the emails meant. He quickly wrote a column that was published in the Daily Caller, in which he printed his own emails (and attacked the person he assumed had leaked them to the Times), before the Times even posted their piece, so there are now dueling explanations--and the Times got scooped by the subject of their reporting. That's the risk to a reporter of asking a subject for comment on an impending story. And a bit like what Acheson did!