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You know you're a "Fossil"...

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Mister Ed Denon taught me how to play the sousaphone, from which I graduated to contrabass (a "real" contrabass).

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very cool and distinctive looking uniforms. Seriously? the Kilties.. 27th

they all look the same now only the colors are different

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I forgot two:

Doing 2-3 parades in 2-3 different cities then a night contest. All in the same day.

When the Color Guard actually performed instead of danced

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Tuthill may have had talent, and may deserve his hall of fame status... but, he's the man that turned the Argonauts Drum and Bugle corps into the Argonauts Marching band. There's a lot of bad blood between my fellow alumni and him.

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I forgot two:

Doing 2-3 parades in 2-3 different cities then a night contest. All in the same day.

When the Color Guard actually performed instead of danced

And don't you mean there was actually a squad on the field who "guarded the colors"? And that there were actually colors to guard?

BTW, you're REALLY a fossil if you remember being on the field before anyone tossed a rifle around.

Big NO Prize to whomever can remember that guy from the Sunrisers who constantly tried to hit the Moon with his tosses.

Puppet

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Which, of course, referred to The Cavaliers now infamous "Circus" show. Looking back, that show ( along with Madison's "Alice In Wonderland" ) charted the course that led us to today's Theme shows.

Oh, let us not forget there were corps in the East who way predated the Theme as Drum Corps. Garfield's Civil War (complete with peace symbol) show comes to mind. Our War themed 1971 show which opened with Valkerie, closed with West Point Alma Mater and had a full fledged riot as the production number.

Puppet

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And don't you mean there was actually a squad on the field who "guarded the colors"? And that there were actually colors to guard?

BTW, you're REALLY a fossil if you remember being on the field before anyone tossed a rifle around.

Big NO Prize to whomever can remember that guy from the Sunrisers who constantly tried to hit the Moon with his tosses.

Puppet

His name was Duke, I met him through David Johnson who I marched with in the Wynn Center Toppers (also marched with us in the St. Rita's Brassmen 1970). Dave was also capable of performing the same type of high throws having done so with the Toppers male indoor guard (The Minutemen) also using a regulation Rifle.

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Oh, let us not forget there were corps in the East who way predated the Theme as Drum Corps. Garfield's Civil War (complete with peace symbol) show comes to mind. Our War themed 1971 show which opened with Valkerie, closed with West Point Alma Mater and had a full fledged riot as the production number.

Puppet

Don't know about the Sunriser's guy but, the Skyliners had a high-tossing rifle guy in 63-64 era named Ray Dandridge that could certainly thrill the fans ... and he did this with a regulation military M1 (I think) weighing between 9-10 lbs.

:-)

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You can name a drum solo by the Corps and the year by hearing it, or you could say the name and Corps and sing it.

Santa Clara, "Young Person's Guide" 1974, 81, "The Clock" 1975, "Birds of Fire" 1975, "Lezginka" 1978, 79, 87.

Blue Devils, "Channel One Suite" 1976,77 78, 86, "Paradox" 1982, 83.

Bridgemen, "Black Market Juggler", 1982, 83.

Now there are snippets. Four measures for snares, then tenors, then basses. All interchangeable, and the movement is becoming more important than the notes.

The Blue Devils are now famous for their warm-up "Diddy" (Which is really cool.)

Not a slam at the kids, but more of a way to say I'm disappointed in the staffs and the current trend.

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So ... let's throw a few more names out there like George Lopez and Wes Myers ... lots of great drum guys from the 50's, 60's 70's and beyond ... how about Ed Fitzgerald, Art Mura, Bobby Peterson, Lefty Petrakis, Joe Mallen, Billy Kaufman ... and the list goes on and on ...

:-)

"Connecticut Halftime":

Some great writers and teachers from the olde "Nutmeg State" include the team of "Condon & Woods" who led the Connecticut Hurricanes to great heights on the olde "M & M" sheets (And World Open Legion Nationals Championships) as well as Hurricanes DM turned drill instructor Bobby Daniels.

Jack Sullivan an Alum of the olde Startford Yankees did a great job with St Raphaels Buccaneers in the 1960's as well as work with several other upstate Connecticut juniors.

Mickey Kelly and Dennis Banks took the Skylarks winter guard to the WGI National Championship way back when, and Jimmy Sherwood did the drill work for Bridgeport PAL's "Thunderbirds" winter guard.

Connecticut's Earl Sturtze, possibly the "Godfather of Runimental Drumming" taught such stellar drumlines as that from the Bridgeport PAL Cadets and St Annes' as well as individul players such as Gary Pagnozzi (Three time VFW Indie National Snare Champ), John Bodnar, Greg Black, Tommy Manion, Ray Ludee (Hurricanes drum arranger/instructor), and DCP's own Andy Lisko.

Elphaba

WWW

Edited by elphaba01

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