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Triple Forte

Any Corps Show Announcements/Info from This Weekend?

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Edited by Jurassic Lancer

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I was planning on using "Simple Song" as my vocal audition... I don't know if I should rethink that or definitely use it, but either way it got a lot scarier! :ninja: haha

Go for it! For me, it is the emotional highlight of "Mass."

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I wouldn't suggest it. It's a great piece of music, but if they are in fact using "Mass," might not said the signals you're hoping to.

Good luck on the audition, btw.

Go for it! For me, it is the emotional highlight of "Mass."

Well crap lol. I'll probably just do it. There's a good chance it won't even be B's Mass, I've been preparing this piece for a while, ad there would really be no way I would know (except here), so I think it's okay. And thank you!

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Bernstein Estategate irritates me. I abso-####-lutely guarantee that tens of thousands of people have been educated through drum corps by exposure to music out of their spheres. When else would we have heard of "Jeremiah?" Orchestras rarely perform it, because the first and third movements inch along at a snail's pace. How about the Mass? Before Garfield '83, who knew it? Medea's Dance of Vengeance? Philip Glass's The Canyon? Unchained Melody? (Ok, no. But I'm still obsessed w/ The Academy.) Is it that arrangers chop music to fit needs? Snark/ How awfully choppy was 1984 Garfield's WSS? The horrors! They played SIX songs in 13 minutes---an average of 2:10 each. Chop, chop, chop. Nobody liked it; it set no standards; Bernstein himself had to be embarrassed. /Snark

I wish the Cadets could go back to their 1980s roots with 11½ minutes of "On the Waterfront." I'm usually not pro-rehash, but it's so identifiable to them, and a clean run would be a blast. Gee, it might possibly lead people to watch the 1954 film masterpiece like it did me. If it's not the best non-John Williams film score out there, it's close. How horrible for the Bernsteins.

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Bernstein Estategate irritates me. I abso-####-lutely guarantee that tens of thousands of people have been educated through drum corps by exposure to music out of their spheres. When else would we have heard of "Jeremiah?" Orchestras rarely perform it, because the first and third movements inch along at a snail's pace. How about the Mass? Before Garfield '83, who knew it? Medea's Dance of Vengeance? Philip Glass's The Canyon? Unchained Melody? (Ok, no. But I'm still obsessed w/ The Academy.) Is it that arrangers chop music to fit needs? Snark/ How awfully choppy was 1984 Garfield's WSS? The horrors! They played SIX songs in 13 minutes---an average of 2:10 each. Chop, chop, chop. Nobody liked it; it set no standards; Bernstein himself had to be embarrassed. /Snark

I

Your attempt at humor and understanding the situation is laughable at best. The feelings that the Bernstein family has on LB's music is completely fair if you look at a large number of examples. They were/are not upset with groups like the Cadets, but the way that the Troopers used it, as well as countless marching bands, and other organizations makes their point valid.

As for your references to the lack of performances of Bernstein's music, and that drum corps helped bring it to the masses, that is absurd. Where it's true that fans of drum corps learned about new music due to corps performing it, it is hardly the reason the music is known. Where do you get your information? There's no research or logic to it.

Using your examples, Jeremiah has been performed by the New York Philharmonic 18 times in its history alone. Feel free to search symphony performance archives and you'll find that your interpretations of the popularity of certain composers are bizarre. Even a simple search on google or youtube of performances show no value to your comments.

Why do you feel that the creators, and those that are closest to compositions should just let people use the music as they wish, with no control?

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Bernstein Estategate irritates me. I abso-####-lutely guarantee that tens of thousands of people have been educated through drum corps by exposure to music out of their spheres. When else would we have heard of "Jeremiah?" Orchestras rarely perform it, because the first and third movements inch along at a snail's pace. How about the Mass? Before Garfield '83, who knew it? Medea's Dance of Vengeance? Philip Glass's The Canyon? Unchained Melody? (Ok, no. But I'm still obsessed w/ The Academy.) Is it that arrangers chop music to fit needs? Snark/ How awfully choppy was 1984 Garfield's WSS? The horrors! They played SIX songs in 13 minutes---an average of 2:10 each. Chop, chop, chop. Nobody liked it; it set no standards; Bernstein himself had to be embarrassed. /Snark

I wish the Cadets could go back to their 1980s roots with 11½ minutes of "On the Waterfront." I'm usually not pro-rehash, but it's so identifiable to them, and a clean run would be a blast. Gee, it might possibly lead people to watch the 1954 film masterpiece like it did me. If it's not the best non-John Williams film score out there, it's close. How horrible for the Bernsteins.

Hearing Cadets 86 show in the early 1990s made me seek out ON THE WATERFRONT, and the film blew me away as much as the music does. I'd be curious to see what modern Cadets would do with that music (I agree that I'm also not a fan of rehashes, but in this case I think it could work out splendidly for Cadets!)

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Your attempt at humor and understanding the situation is laughable at best. The feelings that the Bernstein family has on LB's music is completely fair if you look at a large number of examples. They were/are not upset with groups like the Cadets, but the way that the Troopers used it, as well as countless marching bands, and other organizations makes their point valid.

As for your references to the lack of performances of Bernstein's music, and that drum corps helped bring it to the masses, that is absurd. Where it's true that fans of drum corps learned about new music due to corps performing it, it is hardly the reason the music is known. Where do you get your information? There's no research or logic to it.

Using your examples, Jeremiah has been performed by the New York Philharmonic 18 times in its history alone. Feel free to search symphony performance archives and you'll find that your interpretations of the popularity of certain composers are bizarre. Even a simple search on google or youtube of performances show no value to your comments.

Why do you feel that the creators, and those that are closest to compositions should just let people use the music as they wish, with no control?

As I've gotten older I've come to really respect what creators choose to "accept" as far as others doing their work or arrange for completely different situations. The Bernstein Estate is not licensing his movie to make tons of money in commercial settings, thus cheapening The Maestro's work: they are merely striving to ensure his work is only allowed to be played in ways they think are positive to the original, or in the spirit of the original. Would they approve a swing version of Mass? Maybe if the arrangement were off the hook and inspiring, but I suspect not.

I think, if I may be so bold, they'll generally approve good stuff, and reject the not-great stuff. As a fan of Bernstein's music, I can respect that, and know that if I'm seeing an orchestra do his music, it won't be chopped up or feel "wrong." The thing we forget sometimes in this activity (and WGI, BOA, etc) is that while art is a subjective thing there are a myriad of shows that worked on paper, but not necessarily in execution: we remember the amazing Cadets of the early 80s who made Bernstein's music come alive on a football field. We forget the countless other hacks who have tried and failed miserably to go their own direction and failed, who butchered The Maestro's work, who's reinterpretation feel flat and felt like a hot mess, etc. Heck, even when Cadets, or Kiwanis Kavaliers, or Blue Devils, or even Stan Kenton or Buddy Rich did their own versions of West Side Story, they all felt true to the spirit of the original (and were done incredibly well). Heck, Cadets 1994 was a "modernized" version in visual interpretation but still very true to the original music; when BD mashed it up with Rome & Juliet it was not only a great mix of WSS and the story it was inspired by, but again the music was pretty true to the original. Kiwanis Kavaliers did their take, visually similar to Cadets 94, but with Stan Kenton's arrangements: again true to the original and spirit.

These are all winner that excelled at doing their own thing with WSS: there are too many, though, that have failed and that apparently makes the difference for the Bernstein Estate: and they'd obviously rather be picky than let garbage fly under the name of The Maestro.

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Hearing Cadets 86 show in the early 1990s made me seek out ON THE WATERFRONT, and the film blew me away as much as the music does. I'd be curious to see what modern Cadets would do with that music (I agree that I'm also not a fan of rehashes, but in this case I think it could work out splendidly for Cadets!)

"On The Waterfront" is a brilliant score. It's a shame that Bernstein didn't write more works specifically for film, IMO. In many biographies, most notably the Humphry Burton volume (which is considered by most, including his family, AND sold on the official Bernstein Website) mentions that when Bernstein lost the Oscar 1954 to "The High and Mighty," that he decided not to pursue filming scoring any longer.

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As I've gotten older I've come to really respect what creators choose to "accept" as far as others doing their work or arrange for completely different situations. The Bernstein Estate is not licensing his movie to make tons of money in commercial settings, thus cheapening The Maestro's work: they are merely striving to ensure his work is only allowed to be played in ways they think are positive to the original, or in the spirit of the original. Would they approve a swing version of Mass? Maybe if the arrangement were off the hook and inspiring, but I suspect not.

I think, if I may be so bold, they'll generally approve good stuff, and reject the not-great stuff. As a fan of Bernstein's music, I can respect that, and know that if I'm seeing an orchestra do his music, it won't be chopped up or feel "wrong." The thing we forget sometimes in this activity (and WGI, BOA, etc) is that while art is a subjective thing there are a myriad of shows that worked on paper, but not necessarily in execution: we remember the amazing Cadets of the early 80s who made Bernstein's music come alive on a football field. We forget the countless other hacks who have tried and failed miserably to go their own direction and failed, who butchered The Maestro's work, who's reinterpretation feel flat and felt like a hot mess, etc. Heck, even when Cadets, or Kiwanis Kavaliers, or Blue Devils, or even Stan Kenton or Buddy Rich did their own versions of West Side Story, they all felt true to the spirit of the original (and were done incredibly well). Heck, Cadets 1994 was a "modernized" version in visual interpretation but still very true to the original music; when BD mashed it up with Rome & Juliet it was not only a great mix of WSS and the story it was inspired by, but again the music was pretty true to the original. Kiwanis Kavaliers did their take, visually similar to Cadets 94, but with Stan Kenton's arrangements: again true to the original and spirit.

These are all winner that excelled at doing their own thing with WSS: there are too many, though, that have failed and that apparently makes the difference for the Bernstein Estate: and they'd obviously rather be picky than let garbage fly under the name of The Maestro.

That's exactly it-they are not flat out denying any and all requests, they're just making sure that the music remains the music. Here is a link to the BOA website from a note written in 2010 that spells out what you are saying, and also the Bernstein Estate: http://www.musicforall.org/resources/copyright/leonard-bernstein

So anyone that simply blasts or makes statements saying they do not give permission, is completely wrong.

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I was planning on using "Simple Song" as my vocal audition... I don't know if I should rethink that or definitely use it, but either way it got a lot scarier! :ninja: haha

If you are fabulous, you are fabulous no matter what piece you choose.

Excellence, teachability, able to work and travel well with others (compared to being a diva, and capacity to fulfill commitments will sound as wonderfully. Good luck.)

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