2muchcoffeeman

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2muchcoffeeman last won the day on February 6

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  1. LOL BTW, not that it's a representative sample, but among the Reddit crowd there is some lip-smacking over the music choices (amid the usual wisecracking; it is Reddit, after all)
  2. A valid question, but Troop's You Tube channel is full of exactly what you're looking for (I provided helpful links to a sample of them earlier). And I'm sure there is more of it to come. They are fully aware, and they do not ignore this important wavelength of communication to potential members. Into this abundance of recruitment material they drop a 20-second vid about their music for the season. This blows a hole into their recruitment how?
  3. I dunno, share some cool news in the cold, cold, offseason maybe?
  4. Pretty much agree with this. With each passing season the distinctives between corps has less to do with iconography and more to do with vibe. I don't think any kid tries for BD because of jazz, or goes out for Bloo because of their origins in police outreach. They try out for a corps because they saw this year's show and they say to themselves I want to be part of that kind of show The strongest recruiting tool for next season is the show you put on the field this season. The show -- whatever ineffable quality it has that a 19-year-old finds attractive -- is what is going to motivate that young person to buy a plane ticket to your November camp. The show is the consummation of everything you are -- the vibe of your corps.
  5. If it is stipulated (and more than that, argued as more appropriate) that music reveals are, and should be, made in May and not February, how can their purpose be to attract more people to auditions? The lines are full by then.
  6. I will qualify my previous statements with this: The video does have a "join" tag at the end. But -- they put that at the end of just about every video they ever post. They are in invitation mode 365 days a year.
  7. Um. . . .do other corps reveal their music lineups as a way to entice more people to auditions? No? Then what makes us think the Troopers are doing it for that reason?
  8. I've said it before: Troopers could hand out $100 bills and they'd get criticized for it. It's not as if Troopers don't know how to speak directly to the interests of its customer base, or how to play from the strength of their own heritage. Jumping the gun on licensing is, indeed, a real concern, and one which the Troopers have had to heed in previous seasons, saving their show reveals until May. They've been around the block. So here's an idea. It's wild, and preposterous, I know, because after all this is the Troopers we're talking about. But here it is anyway: Maybe, just maybe, the corps actually has its licensing sewn up for 2020. Maybe they know exactly what they're doing, and have been able to get their programming house in order good and early, in order to get a stronger start on the season. I know, huh? Crazy talk. And maybe, now that they have their program locked up, they want to share a bit about it with the drum corps world. You know, because excitement about the summer is, on balance, a good thing. Fools! Dupes! Know-nothings! Look, it's not like this video drop is the first and last word Troopers ever have, or ever will, say about themselves, their unique character, their place in the activity and the hearts of their members, or even their 2020 show. It's. One. Video. But no. We can't even enjoy it. /rant
  9. Might as well get the party started:
  10. "All my life I have loved edges; and the boundary-line that brings one thing sharply against another. All my life I have loved frames and limits; and I will maintain that the largest wilderness looks larger seen through a window." "I have also a pretty taste in abysses and bottomless chasms and everything else that emphasizes a fine shade of distinction between one thing and another; and the warm affection I have always felt for bridges is connected with the fact that the dark and dizzy arch accentuates the chasm even more than the chasm itself." GK Chesterton You read too much into my point. I did not declare any approach off-limits. I am suggesting, however, that the blue-sky, no-limits approach to drum corps (and thus, its finances and frantic search for financial relief) has been too grounded in one and not curious enough about the other. Building Broadway sets and adding new ingredients, while technically and even truly creative, is in a Chestertonian sense the easy way out. Let's see our arrangers and designers build some bridges over some chasms and show us some vast wildernesses through some frames.
  11. Re All-instruments: At the end of the day, I wasn't persuaded by the half-baked evidence for revenue. I was put off by the proposal's pretensions to justifications other than revenue. Ms. Black's revenue-forward interview only underscored the dissonance. At the same time, I read several arguments that dinos who might have taken their money and gone home would not have moved the needle much on the cash-flow statements of any individual corps. I think that's probably correct. Every corps has a few benefactors with deep pockets. But drum-corps finances is a game of multipliers, not unicorns. Few corps have the resources to simply stand up an entirely new type of touring ensemble that includes WWs, let alone provide such a new ensemble with a circuit of competitions against other similar ensembles. Yet I would welcome the creation of a "major leagues" for marching bands as marching bands. Let a thousand flowers bloom. . . . But now that DCI's revenue-creation task force has been sent back to the drawing board, I would recommend they consider the expense side of the sheet to improve the finances of member corps. Limits are a creative force -- ask any 6 year-old flying to the moon in a cardboard box. For a long while now, maximalism has been the only method rewarded competitively, on the field and in the audition wars. Perhaps a little minimalism would be both a welcome change on the field, among students -- and on the bottom line. Pour more of the available resources into intelligent design and arrangement. More communication and execution, less wow factor. Better transitions within the program, for example, rather than better sound effects. Better writing, and less focus on the backdrop. BK in 2019 gave us a taste of what that could be -- not in their head-spacey kind of mood necessarily, but in their minimalist approach to the stage. They put their focus on the writing and the cohesiveness of their program. It carried them a long way. DCI remains afflicted by a lot of chopped-up, bolted-together programming. That is an avenue for advance and innovation and excellence that isn't cheap, but could be pursued without having to also continue the arms-race side of DCI. Take the Cadets of 2019, lose the staircases and give that boatload of talent a well-built program on a spare canvas, and they would have been 6th place or higher. Perhaps we can leave the Age of Cheap Theatrical Tricks behind, and enter a new age of Smart Adaptation to Limits.
  12. Did not know that. And I can completely understand how they would have proved more of a hindrance than a help. I don't care how good your electronics are, they aren't going to keep up with the sonic wave patterns of 32nd-note rolls at 180bpm. As for reward, I have no idea specifically, of course. It's all part of demand, which in theory ought to factor into the content portion of the perc score.
  13. Ah, thanks for that. Hadn't seen that before. They'll have to follow through on that "possibility" and turn it into "reality" if they want to live up to the stated purpose of the rule change.
  14. I mean, in 2018 they spread the tenors out for 30 yards for one of their features. One of the most impressive displays I've ever seen. Cadets tenors absolutely ripped for something like 7 minutes during their 2019 feature, and it was awesome, but they were packed close while the Bloo 2018 feature was a 30-yard-long high-wire act.