Triple Forte

2018 DVD/BluRays DCI Champ Finals??

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1 hour ago, deftguy said:

Actually, the first Bluray player went on sale to consumers in 2006. The first PROTOTYPE as released in 2003 in Japan. 

DVDs are no longer being released with Bluray combos anymore. DVD sales have been falling 3-6% since Bluray disc was released. I am also surprised it took this long, but I don't buy DCI excuse for keeping Bluray prices so high after all of these years. If small independent studios can license and release independent films and big studio films on Bluray - and it costs only $30 bucks, DCI can do the same thing. 

more people buy the examples you listed.

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On 10/24/2018 at 4:57 PM, jeffmolnar said:

How does DCI not get some sort of license exemption? It’s a non-profit youth organization. I feel like that should be a lay-up for any half decent lawyer.

Does such an exemption exist? If it does, I don’t think the DCI BluRays would qualify since the purpose is to make money. The funds generated may be for a non profit organization, but they are still a commercial product. 

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1 hour ago, Tim K said:

Does such an exemption exist? If it does, I don’t think the DCI BluRays would qualify since the purpose is to make money. The funds generated may be for a non profit organization, but they are still a commercial product. 

“Making money” implies profit though. The Blu-ray sales just help keep a youth music organization afloat. No one is getting rich off of it.

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3 hours ago, jeffmolnar said:

“Making money” implies profit though. The Blu-ray sales just help keep a youth music organization afloat. No one is getting rich off of it.

I think it would be disingenuous to think DCI is not making some sort of profit off the sales of Bluray disc. If you are only breaking even, this would be akin to financially marking time on the 50 yard line.  They have to be making a per disc sale profit, or what is ultimately the point of offering it?  I can understand ditching DVD, there is no money to be made on that format - it has been dying steadily over the last 10 years. 

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On 10/24/2018 at 4:57 PM, jeffmolnar said:

How does DCI not get some sort of license exemption? It’s a non-profit youth organization. I feel like that should be a lay-up for any half decent lawyer.

Corps and bands are non profit yet have to keep licensing for the music they play all nice and legal. Doubt even charity groups can use anything copyrighted without legal permission.

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6 hours ago, deftguy said:

I think it would be disingenuous to think DCI is not making some sort of profit off the sales of Bluray disc. If you are only breaking even, this would be akin to financially marking time on the 50 yard line.  They have to be making a per disc sale profit, or what is ultimately the point of offering it?  I can understand ditching DVD, there is no money to be made on that format - it has been dying steadily over the last 10 years. 

DCI literally cannot make a profit. That's... what "non-profit" means.

They can build up their cash reserves to be a more stable organization, but they can't turn a profit.

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4 hours ago, jeffmolnar said:

DCI literally cannot make a profit. That's... what "non-profit" means.

They can build up their cash reserves to be a more stable organization, but they can't turn a profit.

That is not how it works.  A "not-for-profit" organization like DCI exists for some charitable or educational goal.  They can make as much profit as they want, as long as it is used for the charitable or educational mission of the organization.

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1 hour ago, cixelsyd said:

That is not how it works.  A "not-for-profit" organization like DCI exists for some charitable or educational goal.  They can make as much profit as they want, as long as it is used for the charitable or educational mission of the organization.

Semantics really, we’re essentially saying the same thing. The key difference between them and a typical corporation is there are no shareholders (or private owners) who receive additional compensation if sales are good. Everything feeds back into the organization to keep it healthy.

I get that DCI needs to get the licenses, but it seems way too strict for a youth organization. DCI isn’t stealing any business from the music labels by selling a CD of kids playing brass instruments on a football field. Why are the rights holders so difficult about it?

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Schools are not exempt, and I cannot think of any basis by which DCI should get preferential treatment compared to other educational youth activities.

Or are you contending that music education in general should be exempt?

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