The Cadets and GH history of sexual abuse (news article)


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19 minutes ago, FlamMan said:

Good point. Seems like there should be a statute of limitations for accusations like this.

The fact that it often takes victims so long to come forward, because this kind of misbehavior makes victims feel like they rather than the offender have done something wrong, actually means that statutes of limitation should be longer.

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My wife and I attended Cadets brass camp yesterday. Had some good conversations with some people on the inside of things. Many involved with the corps right now are taking positive steps to help the C

As I try to fight back tears, since my students are in the room right now as I read all this, all I can say right now is...  Thank God for DCP.  Reading here and seeing this conversation tak

I felt nauseated reading this.  Fear for the activity, this needs to be exposed and dealt with not just at Cadets but everywhere, but I’m so scared it’s going to overwhelm the whole activity.  Sadness

9 minutes ago, flugelswerebugels said:

Don't be blinded by the sunlight as you exit your cave.

Was this a well known dirty little secret that GH was forcing himself on cadet members?

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25 minutes ago, geluf said:

That entire board has to go.  Immediately.  Alumni are all well and good, but who has the power to oust the board?  Honestly asking.

The person who gave his resignation to the board had that power.

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9 hours ago, garfield said:

There was a considerable push on these boards and FB months back to DEMAND that DCI take a central role in establishing Best Practice rules for all corps in the activity, and this is exactly why I argued (much to the consternation of some even on this thread) that such a tactic would do more harm than good.  Despite protestations by some here that I was being insensitive to the victims and "...of COURSE..." DCI should develop a central policy, the opposite is actually the correct path -- DCI should have a policy for the employees and interns it hires and then it should throw its hands up and claim NO RESPONSIBILITY for the actions or policies, "best" or otherwise, of the individual corps.

If DCI has a central policy, then Hopkins' escapades would land in Indianapolis and cover all the corps and the activity with his stink.  With no central policy to hang liability on, each corps stands on its own and has a chance to not be covered in Hopkins' excrement.

When passions run high on sensitive subjects, it's often hard to think rationally with an unbiased and unjaundest viewpoint.

Now would be a good time to start recognizing and practicing that idea no matter one's viewpoint of the man or the accusations.

Now as then, I understand what you're saying and appreciate the thoughtfulness, but I disagree. As the Inquirer article notes:

"Saying that it was previously unaware of the allegations against Hopkins, DCI also said it would "conduct its own internal review to determine whether any current members of our staff were aware of these allegations and failed to report them." And now DCI has issued a statement. And other corps are individually issuing statements.

It's just not possible to completely isolate DCI from the member corps like that. Obviously DCI does not have the wherewithal to implement in every corps all the policies I wrote earlier that every organization must have:

"What organizations need to do is emphasize again and again and again that all such behavior will not be tolerated, and all members, staff, volunteers and board must be made fully aware of who to contact if they are the recipient of unwanted behavior (including some outside agency if the allegation concerns a board member), that all allegations will be thoroughly investigated, that the consequences for someone determined to have harassed an employee include termination, and that there will be no retaliation against someone for reporting bad behavior. And there should be annual harassment training."

But DCI can absolutely demand, as a requirement of participation (and yes, I know that DCI ultimately reports to the corps, so this has to be a collective decision), that every corps have such policies and provide some proof that they are maintaining such practices.

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2 hours ago, DeusExGreenMachina said:

You can check out the reddit thread on this subject.  It doesn't appear to be isolated.

Not good.

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I’ve been writing press releases and working in PR and communications for over 20 years, and have yet to see a news release written as poorly as this one. Holy Mary Mother of God - if someone had asked me to write this I would have quit first. 

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2 minutes ago, N.E. Brigand said:

Now as then, I understand what you're saying and appreciate the thoughtfulness, but I disagree. As the Inquirer article notes:

"Saying that it was previously unaware of the allegations against Hopkins, DCI also said it would "conduct its own internal review to determine whether any current members of our staff were aware of these allegations and failed to report them." And now DCI has issued a statement. And other corps are individually issuing statements.

It's just not possible to completely isolate DCI from the member corps like that. Obviously DCI does not have the wherewithal to implement in every corps all the policies I wrote earlier that every organization must have:

"What organizations need to do is emphasize again and again and again that all such behavior will not be tolerated, and all members, staff, volunteers and board must be made fully aware of who to contact if they are the recipient of unwanted behavior (including some outside agency if the allegation concerns a board member), that all allegations will be thoroughly investigated, that the consequences for someone determined to have harassed an employee include termination, and that there will be no retaliation against someone for reporting bad behavior. And there should be annual harassment training."

But DCI can absolutely demand, as a requirement of participation (and yes, I know that DCI ultimately reports to the corps, so this has to be a collective decision), that every corps have such policies and provide some proof that they are maintaining such practices.

Exactly right.

 

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15 hours ago, mcjordansc said:

Hard to see him surviving this story. Nine women with similar stories over 40 years is powerful. Nine women came forward, how many did not? I also find it difficult to believe no one would talk to the YEA investigator. YEA needs to move on this quickly before the summer is lost. 

YEA needs to move quickly because it's the right thing to do.  I'm hoping your first thought was not about saving a year of competition.  

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9 minutes ago, FlamMan said:

Was this a well known dirty little secret that GH was forcing himself on cadet members?

You seem to have forgotten the first rule of holes.

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31 minutes ago, N.E. Brigand said:

 Also, the Inquirer almost certainly would have reached out to the board for response before publishing.

 How ironic it would be, if the Philly paper stated they had" little to no cooperation" from YEA in the newspaper's investigation of these alleged felonies committed within YEA by their CEO.

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